Contents

Pig Killing Day

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Title Saga of the Sanpitch Vol 28
Subject Pioneers
Description Stories and poems about early Southern Utah Pioneers
Publisher Snow College
Date 1996
Type Text
Format image/jpeg
Language eng
Rights Management Snow College
Holding Institution Snow College
ARK ark:/87278/s6m043j1
Setname snowc_sts
Date Created 2005-03-01
Date Modified 2005-03-01
ID 326790
Reference URL https://collections.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s6m043j1

Page Metadata

Title Pig Killing Day
Description Immediately the men began scraping the hair (bristle) off the pig as fast as possible. If the skin cooled off too much the bristle would not come off, and then more of the boiling water was bucketed out of the drum and poured on the pig. My mother would bring out more clean hot water she had heated on the stove. We could add a few more gallons of cool water to the drum, but not enough to cool it down much, while we kept the fire blazing under the drum. Soon the pig was completely scraped clean and looked so white after it had been washed off with more hot water from the drum. Now, more expert knife work was called for as Uncle Al or dad would remove the entrails. Uncle Al would then begin cleaning the small intestines. He would turn them inside out and scrape them clean again washing them with the hot water. There was always the question, "How much sausage do you want?" "Fifteen feet should be enough." Mom would say. Mom would take the cleaned section of intestine in the house where it could be kept until it would become the skin for the sausage. The men would cut the carcass into hams, bacon, sausage meat, and prepare the feet so Mom could make "pickled pig feet" and the head to she could make the Scandinavian favorite, "head cheese." The hams went into the salty, sweet-smelling brine my dad had made. The bacon was made with a strong salt-curing mixture and hung in the cellar. Mother would prepare the ground meat with various seasonings, which would later be put into the sausage stuffer. Later that evening we would be stuffing the sausage meat into the grinder. Mother fed the skin on the sausage tube. We boys would get to put sausage in the stuffer and press it on through the tube. She would measure out various lengths and tie them off with two strings close together. After tying both strings, she would cut the skin between the strings forming the various lengths of sausage. Before the evening chores, the men would clean things up. Knives and scrapers were washed in the hot water from the drum. The water was dumped out of the drum on the fire, and the drum was rolled 79
Format image/jpeg
Identifier 088_Pig Killing Day.jpg
Source Saga of the Sanpitch Vol 28
Setname snowc_sts
Date Created 2005-02-23
Date Modified 2005-02-23
ID 326751
Reference URL https://collections.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s6m043j1/326751