Contents

The Spring Campaign

Update item information
Title Saga of the Sanpitch Vol 20
Subject Pioneers
Description Stories and poems about early Southern Utah Pioneers
Publisher Snow College
Date 1988
Type Text
Format image/jpeg
Language eng
Rights Management Snow College
Holding Institution Snow College
ARK ark:/87278/s68p5xng
Setname snowc_sts
Date Created 2005-03-01
Date Modified 2005-03-01
ID 325053
Reference URL https://collections.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s68p5xng

Page Metadata

Title The Spring Campaign
Description From an old "Household Discoveries" book of my Mother' s, printed in 1909, I quote: "While nous eeleaning, dress appropriately for the necessary tasks facing you. Some housekeepers wear a divided skirt or bloomers that button around the ankles, covered by a large apron. Don' t forget a dust cap. Pull your sleeves up the arms and sleeves. Trim your fingernails as short as can be borne in comfort. This prevents their being torn or broken when working without gloves. Arm yourselves with brooms, pails, ladders, and plenty of old rags to conduct the campaign successfully." It was, indeed, a campaign. Everyone worked with gusto. The men of the family were often drafted to lend a hand, such as carrying summer months. Ceilings were dusted with walls and ceilings were calcimined or papered. applied with a long handled brush. - It gave forth a pungent odor. White wash was applied on the stone walls of the cellar. Probably one of the biggest tasks was that of cleaning carpets. Many people had home-woven carpets, or " rag rugs, " laid over fresh straw in the had to be removed. The carpets were taken out-side and shaken vigorously by people s t anding at each corner. The dusty straw was removed and the wood floors were thoroughly scrubbed with homemade soap. The carpet was then remade sure no wrinkles remained. Children loved to remove their shoes and run over the carpet to feel the fresh, crackling straw beneath. As time went on, many people began buying ni ne-by-twelve Store rugs. At cleaning time, some housekeepers hung them on clotheslines, to beat them with brooms and wire beaters. This was a bonus for the children, who delighted in 107
Format image/jpeg
Identifier 121_The Spring Campaign.jpg
Source Saga of the Sanpitch Vol 20
Setname snowc_sts
Date Created 2005-02-19
Date Modified 2005-02-19
ID 325038
Reference URL https://collections.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s68p5xng/325038