Lectureship Polices and Point of View

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Title Two horizons, a report on the race with catastrophe, The
Subject Civilization, Modern; Education
Description Twelfth annual Frederick William Reynolds memorial lecture.
Creator Clapp, Edwin Roosa, 1902-
Publisher Extension Division, University of Utah
Date 1948-02-11
Date Digital 2008-05-29
Type Text
Format image/jpeg
Digitization Specifications Original scanned on Epson Expression 10000XL flatbed scanner and saved as 400 ppi uncompressed tiff. Display images generated in PhotoshopCS and uploaded into CONTENTdm Aquisition Station.
Resource Identifier http://content.lib.utah.edu/u?/reynolds,308
Source LD5526 .U8 n.s. v.38 no.13
Language eng
Relation Digital reproduction of "The two horizons." Willard Marriott Library Special Collections
Rights Digital Image Copyright University of Utah
Metadata Cataloger Seungkeol Choe; Ken Rockwell
ARK ark:/87278/s6d798c9
Setname uu_fwrl
Date Created 2008-07-29
Date Modified 2008-08-04
ID 319606
Reference URL https://collections.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s6d798c9

Page Metadata

Title Lectureship Polices and Point of View
Description Lectureship Policies and a Point of View From introductory remarks by the President of the Frederick William Reynolds Association at the first annual lecture, January, 1936: "In these lectures, as the years go by, new knowledge, important subjects, and vital issues will be discussed. It is more than likely that some of these issues may be controversial in nature, about which differences of opinion and strong feeling may exist. But even upon such questions it is proposed that the speaker shall be free to approach his subject with intellectual courage and vigor and advance any ideas which he can support with facts and logic. "It is assumed, of course, that good taste shall not be violated, that propaganda in the narrower sense shall never intrude, and that due regard to the rights and feelings of others shall always be evident. But as long as the treatment of a subject is intelligent, objective, and critical, it is assumed that the speaker shall be free to follow facts and reasoning through to their conclusion. "If such a policy, perchance, shall change some of our beliefsâ€" then so be it. For beliefs are the framework upon which we do our thinking. Many present beliefs are the product of other times and other conditions â€" useful then, perhaps, but possibly hampering now. When certain beliefs hinder the effective use of intelligence, or hamper our adjustment to new conditions in a rapidly changing world, then more helpful beliefs become priceless â€" and desirable even at the expense of some temporary loss of tranquility. "The products of intellectual activity and scientific investigation are to be brought here, not the reiteration of uncritical traditional views. On no other basic premise can a Frederick William Reynolds Lecture be true to its name â€" or be even worthy of its name."
Format image/jpeg
Identifier 006-RNLT-ClappER_Lectureship Polices and Point of View.jpg
Source Original Manuscript: The two horizons, a report on the race with catastrophe by Edwin R. Clapp.
Setname uu_fwrl
Date Created 2008-07-29
Date Modified 2008-07-29
ID 319586
Reference URL https://collections.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s6d798c9/319586