Heap Burn

Update item information
Title Saga of the Sanpitch Vol 06
Subject Pioneers
Description Stories and poems about early Southern Utah Pioneers
Publisher Snow College
Date 1974
Type Text
Format image/jpeg
Language eng
Rights Management Snow College
Holding Institution Snow College
ARK ark:/87278/s65x272x
Setname snowc_sts
Date Created 2005-02-26
Date Modified 2005-02-26
ID 324158
Reference URL https://collections.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s65x272x

Page Metadata

Title Heap Burn
Description time to pay visit to the White-man, Mormon settlement. Yesterday was not his first visit here but yet he could not understand all about this funny group of hard-working people. Aa he had done yesterday and times before, Tabiona had wandered from his camp, and peered quietly, full of wonder at these people. At first the White man had been the terror of his people's lives, but little by little through their kind actions and smiles, his fear became curiosity and now had been befriended by every Fort Ephraimite to the point where they recognized him by back or walk. Little by little, as fear had been overcome by piece and fragment, Tabiona had learned a small bit of White man tongue and could understand enough to know that now was a very busy time. Last night he had slept in a hay loft and now today even more than yesterday, the town was a moving thing. Times before Tabiona had spent hours watching the perfect, organized activity of one of natures and hill. These tiny, busy animals had taught him many great lessons. Now already in morning shadows he found him-self in the midst of a large, human ant hill. Wagons, horses, and people darting, hurrying all doing their assignments quite well and effectively. Cleaning, paint- ing, weeding, making their little town ready. Tabiona had understood enough to learn that a man named Brother Brigham was on his way today to pay a visit. He could easily understand that this Brother Brigham was surely an important man. Potatoes, corn, barley, crops were left only to nature's loving care; hay for the winter's cold simply waited until today's tasks were finished and the exciting thing was over. So the town, plot by plot, street by wide square street, was put into order, as fine an order, as a few people could do to a piece of Deseret's arid ground. Tabiona especially noticed that one place received the most attention, the one humble meeting place that stood at the end of town had been scrubbed through-and-through and over again, a new front gate, the yard cleaned and the benches expertly splashed with homespun pine sap varinsh and poll shed new. The nood-day sun brought Tabiona to wander in searchb of a better place for shade that the high rising noon sun drove away everyday. He felt that the people here seemed to trust him now. Before, at first, as wagons filed, and set tracks upon the valley floor. Tabiona's people were a very frightening, heart shuttering image to these pioneers. The pioneers wanted to trust them, for it was their nature to trust everyone, but because of fear and uncertainty they just couldn't. As the settlement began to materialize the illusions of fierce, savage, blood-thirsty, primitive hatred-filled people, little by little left the new inhabitants as they realized that these fearsome people with whom they were to share the valley were truly a very quiet, peaceable and interesting people. Through the settling of the valley, Tabiona emerged as the one to ask for help, how best to live with the arid land or extreme temperatures, how to bring the very best from the soil he knew so well. That is why he was allowed to sleep last night in Nate Edmunds' hay loft; that's why he could wander about the town and no one would cast an untrusting glance. By noon, the activity of the ant hill slowed its pace and the people returned to their Houses. Before very long all returned by ones, twos, or by families- -36-
Format image/jpeg
Identifier 046_Heap Burn.jpg
Source Saga of the Sanpitch Vol 6
Setname snowc_sts
Date Created 2005-02-19
Date Modified 2005-02-19
ID 324109
Reference URL https://collections.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s65x272x/324109