Contents

Wash Hands, Thank You

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Title Saga of the Sanpitch Vol 11
Subject Pioneers
Description Stories and poems about early Southern Utah Pioneers
Publisher Snow College
Date 1979
Type Text
Format image/jpeg
Language eng
Rights Management Snow College
Holding Institution Snow College
ARK ark:/87278/s66w9876
Setname snowc_sts
Date Created 2005-03-01
Date Modified 2005-03-01
ID 323200
Reference URL https://collections.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s66w9876

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Title Wash Hands, Thank You
Description until bubbles frothed up around them, then he plunged them into the to back. Then he handed the soap to Topaddie with the instructions, "Now you wash." When they got back to the tables, Walt signaled that he would give the blessing on the food. He bowed his head and began, "Our His voice droned on. "For this food ae are about to partake of, need in furthering Thy work here upon the earth." Topaddie's stomach growled In dismay. Then finally at the signal "Amen," everyone reached for food. They ate until the plates and bowls paddle took the last chunk of bread and sopped the stew pot up. He belly, a loud belch of satisfaction and appreciation rolling from his throat. The younger children began to snicker until they heard a warn- and Topaddie walked up onto the porch* away from the clatter of tables being cleared and dishes being washed. "Now," Halt asked, "what is it that you want?" The Indian sat down on the board floor and started telling him of some wagons over near the Green River that had been left by Johnston's Army. He mapped out the whole route, describing and locating the mountain, civet and valley, and how far they would have to travel without water. He, Topaddie, would show his friend, Halt Cox, where these wagons were located. "Topaddie, can you be here this same time tomorrow evening? I will have ay answer for you then." That would be good, Topaddie thought. There would be food again. Then he agreed to tomorrow at the same tine and left-Papa watched him go, then walked to the gong and called his family to return. They gathered quickly, for whenever the signal sounded, it signified an emergency. He explained Topaddie's offer. The journey would take many away froca any settlements. He would have to depend upon his Indian qulde to lead him. If their paths crossed that of renegade Indians, could Topaddie be trusted? Would he have any influence against renegades? All these things the family pondered and deliberated. On the other side of the coin was the desperate need for the
Format image/jpeg
Identifier 101_Wash Hands, Thank You.jpg
Source Saga of the Sanpitch Vol. 11
Setname snowc_sts
Date Created 2005-02-19
Date Modified 2005-02-19
ID 323189
Reference URL https://collections.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s66w9876/323189