Contents

Fungi and Mycotic Diseases

Title Walsh and Hoyt's Clinical Neuro-Ophthalmology
Date 2005
Subject Neurology; Ophthalmology; Eye Diseases
Description Walsh and Hoyt's Clinical Neuro-Ophthalmology
Type Text
Rights North American Neuro-Ophthalmology Association (NANOS), Copyright 2011. For further information regarding the rights to this collection, please visit http://library.med.utah.edu/NOVEL/about/copyright
ARK ark:/87278/s6rj4hsw
ID 190107
setname ehsl_novel_wht
Reference URL https://collections.lib.utah.edu/details?id=190107

Page Metadata

Identifier CH50_2775-2852
Title Fungi and Mycotic Diseases
Alternative Title Section 11: Chapter 50
Creator Weinstein, Joel M
Affiliation University of Wisconsin and University of Wisconsin Hospital
Publisher Spencer S. Eccles Health Sciences Library, University of Utah
Date 2005
Subject Infectious Diseases; Fungi; Molds; Yeasts; Prototheca Wickerhamii; Central Nervous System Fungal Infections
Description "Opportunistic fungal infections are common and continue to increase in frequency and severity as a consequence of the use of immunosuppressive therapy after solid-organ transplantation and for a variety of diseases, particularly cancer, and because of the increasing prevalence of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) (1–6)."
Abstract "Opportunistic fungal infections are common and continue to increase in frequency and severity as a consequence of the use of immunosuppressive therapy after solid-organ transplantation and for a variety of diseases, particularly cancer, and because of the increasing prevalence of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) (1–6). Infections caused by fungi can be broadly divided into those that take advantage of defects in polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs), such as aspergillosis, mucormycosis, and candidiasis, and those that take advantage of a defect in the phagocytic ability of T-lymphocytes, such as coccidioidomycosis, cryptococcosis, and histoplasmosis (1,7,8). In this chapter, we consider the fungi that are most often pathogenic in hu-mans and frequently affect the ocular and central nervous system(CNS). The taxonomic classification of fungi that we have used is meant to be current (9); however, it must be emphasized that continued improvement in techniques that permit detailed analysis of the structural components, genetic material, and metabolic activities of these fungi may result in reclassification. Most primary infections are subclinical and occur in persons with a normal immune system. Many fungi, however, have the ability to remain dormant for long periods, so that if the formerly resistant host becomes immune depressed at a later date, the fungus multiplies and the host becomes symptomatic."
Type Text
Format application/pdf
Extent 4.5 MB
Language eng
Rights North American Neuro-Ophthalmology Association (NANOS), Copyright 2011. For further information regarding the rights to this collection, please visit http://library.med.utah.edu/NOVEL/about/copyright
Is Part of Neuro-Ophthalmology Virtual Education Library (NOVEL)
Publication Type Book chapter
ID 190092
setname ehsl_novel_wht
Reference URL https://collections.lib.utah.edu/details?id=190092
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