Contents

A Sawmill Amid Tranquility

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Title Saga of the Sanpitch Vol 21
Subject Pioneers
Description Stories and poems about early Southern Utah Pioneers
Publisher Snow College
Date 1989
Type Text
Format application/pdf
Language eng
Rights Management Snow College
Holding Institution Snow College
ARK ark:/87278/s6cf9n7t
Setname snowc_sts
Date Created 2005-03-01
Date Modified 2005-03-01
ID 325980
Reference URL https://collections.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s6cf9n7t

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Title A Sawmill Amid Tranquility
Description with shady, cool, tranquility-almost as if I were entering another world. Bven to this day, I experience that same treasured memory each time I stroll down that trail for a visit to the old sawmill set. These memories originated more than half-a-century ago through eyes of an eight-year-old boy and many of the details have faded. However, I would like to relate some of the things I remember from the five summers spent in C Canyon, The campsite overlooked a small open valley surrounded with pines and aspen. A nearby spring offered a constant, cool, refreshing water supply. Three tents were used mostly for sleeping and storage, while a fourth much larger tent served as kitchen and dining room as well as bedroom for Ila, Dad and three-year-old brother. For this tent Sad built walls and floor from fresh-sawn lumber; this sturdy floor made Ma's task of cooking three meals a day somewhat more bearable. She baked yeast bread, baking powder biscuits or sour dough biscuits every day, not to mention pancakes, pies, cakes and other desserts. There were always eight or more healthy appetites to satisfy. Ma's cooking was a temptation to anyone in the area, so it wasn't uncommon for sheepherders from nearby camps to happen by at meal time, and they were always welcome. Some whom I remember were: Call Draper and his brother-in-law, Boyle Robertson, "Shorty" Larsen, "Walt" Ollerton, and Uncle "Hen" Brady. One must remember, all work was done by hand or horse power! No such thing as a chain saw or forklift-heister. The timber was felled and trimmed with ax and tvro-Hnan saw. Logs were manually lubbered around and rolled up loading ramps onto wagons with the aid of crow bars and cant hooks. However, logs just above camp could be snaked right to the mill with a horse. The mill was powered by a steam engine Dad had purchased from George F. Olson, Ny oldest brother fell heir to the task (or privilege) or operating the big steamer. In my nemory I can see him up there turning 28
Format application/pdf
Identifier 042_A Sawmill Amid Tranquility.jpg
Source Saga of the Sanpitch Vol 21
Setname snowc_sts
Date Created 2005-02-23
Date Modified 2005-02-23
ID 325867
Reference URL https://collections.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s6cf9n7t/325867