Contents

Old Poor Farm

Update item information
Title Saga of the Sanpitch Vol 22
Subject Pioneers
Description Stories and poems about early Southern Utah Pioneer
Publisher Snow College
Date 1990
Type Text
Format image/jpeg
Language eng
Rights Management Snow College
Holding Institution Snow College
ARK ark:/87278/s6k64g79
Setname snowc_sts
Date Created 2005-03-01
Date Modified 2005-03-01
ID 323884
Reference URL https://collections.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s6k64g79

Page Metadata

Title Old Poor Farm
Description Alvin spent his summers helping on the fann where wheat and alfalfa were raised. "7e had a good garden and a cow herd," he recalled. "The patients who were able, worked," Alvin said, and this helped create a "bond of love between them and the Haniltons. "".-/hen my grandparents left, it was a regular funeral," said Alvin. Jessie and Lindon Christensen fondly remember how the farm once produced beautiful flowers, a vegetable garden and bounteous orchards. The infirmary was equipped with electricity and a coal furnace which had to be hand fed* Running water came from nearby springs which were shared with two Clement families living nearby. Workers put up their own ice in the winter and stored it underground for use in the summer to keep foods fresh. The ice was brought in and used in the ice box, which was in the men's dining room. Sides of beef were also hung there. Jessie remembers separating the cream with the old separator and taking the cream to town where it was sold. The noney was used to "buy groceries. The central kitchen on the east side was flanked by two pantries which contained supplies and a place for washing dishes. Some of the women who could, hleped with the work. A girl was also hired to do the scrubbing. Sunday school was held in the side hallway, which had benches on each side. A man named Throll, who was quite religious, conducted the services and led in prayer and singing. Jessie told of the different ways each contributed to the atmosphere of the infirmary and hoi/ each added something. John Follett, a blind man, played checkers on a raised checkerboard, and could also play the violin. North worked as a foreman on the farm even though he was deaf. It was a working farm and contained 80 acres, which raised enough food for all. Ixed, who was a civil engineer, had a breakdown, but read a lot. He was strong and could do heavy work. Taminee was crippled with rheumatics and helped North on the farm and TJnice '.Vhite do the ladies dishes. 27
Format image/jpeg
Identifier 040_Old Poor Farm.jpg
Source Saga of the Sanpitch Vol 22
Setname snowc_sts
Date Created 2005-02-23
Date Modified 2005-02-23
ID 323824
Reference URL https://collections.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s6k64g79/323824