Touches on Time

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Title Saga of the Sanpitch Vol 05
Subject Pioneers
Description Stories and poems about early Sothern Utah Pioneers
Publisher Snow College
Date 1973
Type Text
Format image/jpeg
Language eng
Rights Management Snow College
Holding Institution Snow College
ARK ark:/87278/s6tm788q
Setname snowc_sts
Date Created 2005-02-24
Date Modified 2005-02-24
ID 323578
Reference URL https://collections.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s6tm788q

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Title Touches on Time
Description little else but willing hearts and their new found faith. Though time of year was premature and in the dead of win-ter, they started their new homes at sacrifice in lives and equipment, and finances. They were cold, hungry, and in despair many times. Yes, some even dared to doubt, but they beat their doubts into plow shares and plowed them under the desert earth. They used dung of cattle and buffalo for fuel when snows were so deep that they could not log from nearby hills. Their adobes, made of prairie mud and sod of valley were called "desert marble," their hard packed dirt floors were swept with corn husk brooms. Their floors, like their adobes, were concrete hard because they were baked by desert wind and sun. They heard the fluting of the frongs and the whine of desert insect that rose from belly high, lush grasses in summer. They heard the lonely howl of wolf and coyote, and other animal pre- dators, who also hunted to seek out a living in winter. Barbed wire did not ring their portioned out land then, like protective moats. Fences were not used until land grabbers and homesteaders killed off most of the cowboys and turned them into ranches. Herds roamed at will and everything was shared. Against odds of nature they planted, they reaped and they succeeded. They learned to hold the water, after high places had released it from winter storage, then turned it into ditches and furrows to relieve the blistered earth, all this they did at a given time and given day for their water turns. They builded on firm foundations from near by logs and from stone from "soon to be" holy, oolite hill. They built schools, Temple, churches, homes until it became the most beautiful city in the world, to them, and not in just the west. The courage of ordinary people built an extraordinary city in spite of all these hostile elements! 40
Format image/jpeg
Identifier 052_Touches on Time.jpg
Source Saga of the Sanpitch Vol. 5
Setname snowc_sts
Date Created 2005-02-23
Date Modified 2005-02-23
ID 323575
Reference URL https://collections.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s6tm788q/323575