Page 19

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Title New frontiers for American youth
Subject Social ethics; Social problems
Description Fourth annual Frederick William Reynolds memorial lecture.
Creator Bennion, Milton, 1870-1953.
Publisher The Extension division, University of Utah
Date 1939-11-29
Date Digital 2008-05-29
Type Text
Format image/jpeg
Digitization Specifications Original scanned on Epson Expression 10000XL flatbed scanner and saved as 400 ppi uncompressed tiff. Display images generated in PhotoshopCS and uploaded into CONTENTdm Aquisition Station.
Resource Identifier http://content.lib.utah.edu/u?/reynolds,596
Source LD5526 .U8 n.s. v.30 no.6
Language eng
Relation Digital reproduction of "New frontiers for American youth," J. Willard Marriott Library Special Collections
Rights Digital Image Copyright University of Utah
Metadata Cataloger Seungkeol Choe; Ken Rockwell
ARK ark:/87278/s61r9nrj
Setname uu_fwrl
Date Created 2008-07-29
Date Modified 2013-05-20
ID 319890
Reference URL https://collections.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s61r9nrj

Page Metadata

Title Page 19
Description INJUSTICE OF ECONOMIC ISOLATION 19 the benefits of the uses of the natural resources and the social heritage. There is, of course, the obligation on the part of youth to make the very best use of their opportunities. One of the most difficult frontiers for American youth today is the question of international peace or war. While the problem of war is by no means new, under present conditions it is far more destructive than ever before. Recent attempts at international organization have been very disappointing, due in large measure to selfishness on the part of the dominant nations, and the general disposition among nations to return evil for evil, which tends only to multiply evil. Whether it be Bismarck, the iron chancellor, punishing the French; or Clemenceau, the tiger of France, punishing the Germans, the consequences are the sameâ€"a never-ending international feud. A different way of dealing in international affairs is illustrated in the action of the United States in case of the Boxer indemnity. Approximately half of the indemnity paid was returned to China and was used to help educate Chinese youth in American universities. Thus a bond of friendship was established between China and our own country. The remedy for present world ills consists in extending to international relations the principles of social ethics, well recognized in domestic relations. Here is a challenging new frontier for the youth of all nations. May they not devise means of totally abolishing war, that relic of barbarism now made the more barbaric by the applications of modern science to the destruction of civilian populations, men, women and children? Private duelling, once common, has been abolished by domestic laws. By the Paris Pact, agreed to by sixty nations, war was outlawed. International contracts, it now appears, may be annulled by some nations whenever in their opinion it is expedient to do so. One of the major causes of this unfortunate circumstance is the manifest national inequality of economic opportunity. Peace cannot long endure with large populations facing serious privations while others have superabundance. Economic isolation is one of the primary causes of war. If permanent peace is to be secured the world's resources must be made more accessible to all. This can be accomplished in some measure, at least, through reciprocal trade agreements between nations. This plan in the abstract has received wide approval. In the concrete, however, most particular agreements are opposed by the industries whose profits are thereby diminished, even though consumers both at home and abroad would be substantially benefited. There is also the argument of the more favored nations that their standards of living must not be jeopardized by imports from less favored nations, irrespective of the fate of these nations who are without access to raw materials or other means of improving their economic condition. Prosperous nations have for generations sent missionaries to the poor heathen nations to offer
Format image/jpeg
Identifier 017-RNLT-BennionM_Page 19.jpg
Source Original Manuscript: New frontiers for American youth, by Milton Bennion.
Setname uu_fwrl
Date Created 2008-07-29
Date Modified 2008-07-29
ID 319885
Reference URL https://collections.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s61r9nrj/319885