Page 15

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Title Is Utah Sahara Bound?
Subject Agriculture--Utah; Land use--Utah
Description The 11th Annual Frederick William Reynolds Lecture.
Creator Cottam, Walter Pace, 1894-
Publisher Extension Division, University of Utah
Date 1947-02-19
Date Digital 2008-05-29
Type Text
Format image/jpeg
Digitization Specifications Original scanned on Epson Expression 10000XL flatbed scanner and saved as 400 ppi uncompressed tiff. Display images generated in PhotoshopCS and uploaded into CONTENTdm Aquisition Station.
Resource Identifier http://content.lib.utah.edu/u?/reynolds,458
Source LD5526 .U8 n.s. v.37 no.11
Language eng
Relation Digital reproduction of "Is Utah Sahara Bound?," J. Willard Marriott Library Special Collections
Rights Digital Image Copyright University of Utah
Metadata Cataloger Seungkeol Choe; Ken Rockwell
ARK ark:/87278/s6w66hr0
Setname uu_fwrl
Date Created 2008-07-29
Date Modified 2009-03-13
ID 319731
Reference URL https://collections.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s6w66hr0

Page Metadata

Title Page 15
Description EVIDENCE OF VEGETATIONAL CHANGE 15 (2) Sagebrush, little rabbitbrush and juniper with little or no palatability value for livestock, show a preponderance of young age groups, abundant reproduction, high vigor, and low mortality. They give every evidence of being actively invading forms. (3) Shadscale, having only medium palatability, occupies two distinct soil types: upland areas of shadscale are characterized by comparatively young populations that show high mortality during drought years while the low valley shadscale show old stands that maintain a high state of vigor even in drought years. The implication seems to be that shadscale can withstand the physiological drought of low, wet, salty soil, but not the physical drought of the drier uplands, and in pre-whiteman time was confined to the lower areas. Unquestionably, most of the desert vegetation of Utah has undergone significant transformation during the past century with respect to the quantity and quality of forage. Some types have experienced complete change of aspect. In a critical study of two desert valleys in Utahâ€"Pine Valley and Wah Wah Valley, both situated west of Beaver, Utah, and both representative valleys of the Great Basinâ€"data which I helped to secure indicate the probable quantitative changes that have occurred. These are summarized in the following table, and although these data involve only a few thousand acres, still they are important in indicating probable quantitative changes over much of the Great Basin. Table I Showing Probable Quantitative Changes in Plant Types in the Great Basin in Utah Major types % area 1937 % area 1847 Juniper-pinyon...................................................................... 38 10 Sagebrush................................._........................................... 11 1 Rabbitbrush........................................................._............... 13 1 White sage (Eucotia lanata)............................................ 9 25 Shadscale..........................................................,................... 21 10 Greasewood.......................................................................... 5 5 Grass.................................................................................... 0 45 Miscellaneous.............................................-----.........------- 1 1 Playa (barren) ____.....................................-.....-----........ 2 2 Considering briefly the status of mountain vegetation of Utah, it may be said categorically that there has been no appreciable change of type aspect down to the pigmy forest foothills. However, in all of the vegetation types excepting the alpine tundra where herds rarely graze, there has been significant change, both in the quantity and the quality of forage, depending of course on the degree and type of grazing use. There are few historical data to support this conclusion for there has been little written, but considerable range data lend credence to it.
Format image/jpeg
Identifier 015-RNLT-CottamWP_Page 15.jpg
Source Original Manuscript: Is Utah Sahara Bound? by Walter P. Cottam.
Setname uu_fwrl
Date Created 2008-07-29
Date Modified 2008-07-29
ID 319704
Reference URL https://collections.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s6w66hr0/319704