GRL_SIPAPU_PAGE58

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Title Through the Sipapu: A Canyonlands Phantasy
Subject Indians of North America; Spiritualism; Fantasy
Description Fictional story of creation and the afterlife as seen by Native Americans of Utah.
Creator Baker, Pearl Biddlecomb (1907-1992)
Publisher Baker, Pearl Biddlecomb
Date Digital 2004-07-09
Date 1986
Type Text
Format image/jpeg
Identifier 130.xml
Source Original booklet: Through the Sipapu: A Canyonlands Phantasy
Language eng
Rights Management Digital image copyright 2004, Green River Public Library. All rights reserved.
Holding Institution Green River Public Library, 85 South Long St., Green River, UT 84525
Source Physical Dimensions 60 leaves ; 28 cm.
Scanning Technician Nima Rakhsha
Metadata Cataloger Denice Hoffman
ARK ark:/87278/s6xs5v8n
Setname gr_pbb
Date Created 2005-03-18
Date Modified 2005-03-18
ID 317792
Reference URL https://collections.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s6xs5v8n

Page Metadata

Title GRL_SIPAPU_PAGE58
Description Baker Sipapu 58 nursing, it was rewarding and she loved it, but this was where she wanted to be. During the worst weather she would have to move into Monticello and put Jimbo in school, but he could ride down to a ranch where he could catch the bus, mostly, but not in the dead of the severe winters. Most of the year she would be here, living the way she wanted to. As she took the roast out of the oven, arranged the vegetables around it on the tray and set it back into the still-warm oven, she recalled some of her early experiences. She remembered the first load of lumber and cement they had brought out for the house. Jim had nailed down a floor, added a couple of boards for siding, and stretched a tent for them to live comfortably in. Then he had gone off to find some help for the next day, and she and Jimbo, who was three--no, two 1-to settle in. With his too-liberal ideas of help, Jimbo took some watching, but they had got the things out of boxes and onto the shelves, the bed made, and had settled down on the bed to listen to the rain on the tent and take a late nap. It was April then, too, a little later than now. She had awakened, and sat up to look out through the tied-back tent flaps. Suddenly a sunbeam illuminated a tall pine down by where the barn would be. Every needle on the tree was lighted, from the tip right down to the small hummock and the two rocks where the tree grew out of the ground. The rocks looked like a throne and for the first
Format image/jpeg
Identifier 063_GRL_SIPAPU_PAGE58.JPG
Source Original booklet: Pearl Baker: Interviewed by John McFarlane
Setname gr_pbb
Date Created 2005-03-18
Date Modified 2005-03-18
ID 317789
Reference URL https://collections.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s6xs5v8n/317789