GRL_SIPAPU_PAGE54

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Title Through the Sipapu: A Canyonlands Phantasy
Subject Indians of North America; Spiritualism; Fantasy
Description Fictional story of creation and the afterlife as seen by Native Americans of Utah.
Creator Baker, Pearl Biddlecomb (1907-1992)
Publisher Baker, Pearl Biddlecomb
Date Digital 2004-07-09
Date 1986
Type Text
Format application/pdf
Identifier 130.xml
Source Original booklet: Through the Sipapu: A Canyonlands Phantasy
Language eng
Rights Management Digital image copyright 2004, Green River Public Library. All rights reserved.
Holding Institution Green River Public Library, 85 South Long St., Green River, UT 84525
Source Physical Dimensions 60 leaves ; 28 cm.
Scanning Technician Nima Rakhsha
Metadata Cataloger Denice Hoffman
ARK ark:/87278/s6xs5v8n
Setname gr_pbb
Date Created 2005-03-18
Date Modified 2005-03-18
ID 317792
Reference URL https://collections.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s6xs5v8n

Page Metadata

Title GRL_SIPAPU_PAGE54
Description Baker Sipapu 54 I realized that for him, his tools and weapons were best. I threw the knife away. "I begged the Medicine Man desperately for help, and he put me through a course of study as he did the young men of the Clan. I studied as I had never studied before, and although I didn't understand the chants, I felt I was not too bad in them. But for my life, since, I cannot remember one sound we made. I keep wondering if the Indian chants and dances will mean something to me. "I had about finished this course of study the day you rescued me," Bob went on. "Then I stumbled onto the Canyonlands Rainbow Dance by the Canyonlands Spirit Maidens. Always I have felt," he looked down shyly, "that the spirits of Canyonlands were feminine. Well, they are, and I saw the most beautiful of their dances. The rainbow is not only their symbol, but also their power, and if they have a far journey taking someone or something or going to bring something back, they spin out a rainbow and travel on it. If we see a rainbow where it should not be, we don't remember it long enough to make any difference, and they race along it miles and miles per second. "Nothing could have convinced me of my fatal mortality like the rainbow dance. I could understand it, could enjoy it, could sense its beauty and some of its meaning, but at last I understood how far I had to go before I was fit to enter the sipapu. Then the Clan panicked, when you came
Format application/pdf
Identifier 059_GRL_SIPAPU_PAGE54.JPG
Source Original booklet: Pearl Baker: Interviewed by John McFarlane
Setname gr_pbb
Date Created 2005-03-18
Date Modified 2005-03-18
ID 317785
Reference URL https://collections.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s6xs5v8n/317785