GRL_SIPAPU_PAGE12

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Title Through the Sipapu: A Canyonlands Phantasy
Subject Indians of North America; Spiritualism; Fantasy
Description Fictional story of creation and the afterlife as seen by Native Americans of Utah.
Creator Baker, Pearl Biddlecomb (1907-1992)
Publisher Baker, Pearl Biddlecomb
Date Digital 2004-07-09
Date 1986
Type Text
Format image/jpeg
Identifier 130.xml
Source Original booklet: Through the Sipapu: A Canyonlands Phantasy
Language eng
Rights Management Digital image copyright 2004, Green River Public Library. All rights reserved.
Holding Institution Green River Public Library, 85 South Long St., Green River, UT 84525
Source Physical Dimensions 60 leaves ; 28 cm.
Scanning Technician Nima Rakhsha
Metadata Cataloger Denice Hoffman
ARK ark:/87278/s6xs5v8n
Setname gr_pbb
Date Created 2005-03-18
Date Modified 2005-03-18
ID 317792
Reference URL https://collections.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s6xs5v8n

Page Metadata

Title GRL_SIPAPU_PAGE12
Description Baker Sipapu 12 "But only with faith," the Weaver paused in her work to give him her full attention; something she had never done before. "Only with faith! Talk to the Medicine Man." Her mind closed, and Bob had to go back to his sand shelf to think this over. Bob was in awe of the Medicine Man. Growing up with Indians he knew how these leaders were revered by the tribe. He felt he could not just go up and ask questions and demand answers. If he could take some gift--and his eyes strayed out into the valley, to the burned plane. Surely there would be something on the plane, or some tool in it that the Clan could use better than the flint tools the Medicine Man made. The next day he took the two tree limbs that Rain had brought to use for crutches, and made his way early in the morning down to the plane. It lay at the foot of the butte, a crushed, twisted mass of melted metal. There was simply nothing he could salvage. He turned to go back to the cave and noticed a glint of reflection between the butte and the cedar that had broken his fall. He limped over and picked up his cherished Buck knife that had always been with him. It was still in the leather scabbard, but the belt tie was broken. He found a string in his pocket and hung the scabbard again to his belt. It was mid-morning before Bob made it back to the cave, but he went directly to the Medicine Man and knelt down as he had seen the teen-agers that the Medicine Man coached, do.
Format image/jpeg
Identifier 017_GRL_SIPAPU_PAGE12.JPG
Source Original booklet: Pearl Baker: Interviewed by John McFarlane
Setname gr_pbb
Date Created 2005-03-18
Date Modified 2005-03-18
ID 317743
Reference URL https://collections.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s6xs5v8n/317743