Racial and ethnic differences in general health status and limiting health conditions among American children: parental reports in the 1999 National Survey of America's Families

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Publication Type Working Paper
School or College College of Social & Behavioral Science
Department Sociology
Program Institute of Public and International Affairs (IPIA)
Creator Wen, Ming
Title Racial and ethnic differences in general health status and limiting health conditions among American children: parental reports in the 1999 National Survey of America's Families
Date 2006-09-01
Description Objectives: This research investigates the association between race/ethnicity and child health and examines the role of family structure, family SES, and healthcare factors in this association. Five major racial/ethnic groups in the United States are studied. Two child health outcomes including parent-rated health and limiting health condition are examined. The analysis is stratified into three age groups: age 0 to 5, age 6 to 11, and age 12 to 17. Design: Cross-sectional study using data from a large nationally representative sample collected in 1999 in the United States. Results: For general health, older age groups tend to exhibit larger racial/ethnic disparities. With few exceptions, minority groups showed higher risk of poor health relative to Whites among children age 6 to 17. In the youngest group (age 0 to 5), only Latinos have significant health disadvantage. As to limiting health condition, black children prior to adolescence are slightly disadvantaged, Native American adolescents are significantly more likely to have limiting conditions, whereas Asian adolescents are better off than Whites. Family SES explains some black, Latino, and Native American effects but not all; and SES does not explain the Asian effects. Family structure and healthcare factors generally do not contribute much to the racial/ethnic differences but they can have significant effects on child health in their own right. We also find that economic resources play a more salient role in child health than parental education especially in younger children. And healthcare factors to some extent explain why children from higher SES family fare better. Conclusion: Racial/ethnic disparities in health start early in life. Except for Asians, class explains a substantial amount but not all of these disparities. Healthcare factors play a prominent role in explaining disparities by class. Structural solution is needed to reduce disparities by race and ethnicity particularly in younger children.
Type Text
Publisher University of Utah
Subject Socioeconomic status; Health care; Children; Race; Ethnicity
Subject LCSH Children -- Health and hygiene; Family; Ethnic groups
Language eng
Bibliographic Citation Wen, M. (2006). Racial and ethnic differences in general health status and limiting health conditions among American children: Parental reports in the 1999 National Survey of America's Families. Institute of Public International Affairs (IPIA).
Series Institute of Public and International Affairs Working Papers
Rights Management (c) 2006 University of Utah
Format Medium application/pdf
Format Extent 251,360 bytes
Identifier ir-main,597
ARK ark:/87278/s6f19h7n
Setname ir_uspace
Date Created 2012-06-13
Date Modified 2021-05-06
ID 706294
Reference URL https://collections.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s6f19h7n
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