Cerebral infarction and subdural hematoma. Advantage of nuclear magnetic resonance imaging in cerebral ischemia.

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Title Journal of Neuro-Ophthalmology, December 1984, Volume 4, Issue 4
Publisher Lippincott, Williams & Wilkins
Date 1984-12
Type Text
Language eng
Rights Management © North American Neuro-Ophthalmology Society
Publication Type Journal Article
ARK ark:/87278/s6df9x9b
Setname ehsl_novel_jno
Date Created 2011-01-12
Date Modified 2020-03-03
ID 226802
Reference URL https://collections.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s6df9x9b

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Title Cerebral infarction and subdural hematoma. Advantage of nuclear magnetic resonance imaging in cerebral ischemia.
Creator Mauskop, Alexander; Wolintz, Arthur H.; Valderrama, Ramon
Subject Aged; Brain Ischemia; Cerebral Infarction; Hallucinations; Hematoma, Subdural; Humans; Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy; Male; Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Abstract Visual hallucinations were the initial complaints in a patient with a posterior cerebral artery occlusions who fell and sustained bilateral subdural hematomas. In addition to poor vision, the patient experienced formed visual hallucinations of the epileptic type in the hemianopic field. The hemianopia was dense with macular sparing. CAT scans, which were done pre- and postoperatively, showed no abnormalities in the temporal and occipital lobes to explain the "epileptic visual hallucinations" and macular sparing. The NMR scan showed low-density changes in those areas. At the time that the NMR scan was done, most of the patient's deficits, including the hemianopia and hallucinations, had resolved.
OCR Text Show
Publisher Lippincott, Williams & Wilkins
Date 1984-12
Type Text
Language eng
Rights Management © North American Neuro-Ophthalmology Society
Publication Type Journal Article
Setname ehsl_novel_jno
Date Created 2011-01-12
Date Modified 2020-03-24
ID 226794
Reference URL https://collections.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s6df9x9b/226794