Oscillopsia: a common symptom of bilateral vestibular loss

Update item information
Identifier Oscillopsia_scene
Title Oscillopsia: a common symptom of bilateral vestibular loss
Subject VOR Abnormal, HIT Abnormal
Creator Daniel R. Gold, DO, Departments of Neurology, Ophthalmology, Neurosurgery, Otolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery, Emergency Medicine, and Medicine, The Johns Hopkins School of Medicine
Description This video is an example of what a patient with bilateral vestibular loss experiences while walking. Without a VOR, there is no mechanism to ensure retinal stability of the world with each head movement, and oscillopsia (illusion of movement of the stationary environment) is the result. Jumpy vision during ambulation or when driving on a bumpy road for example is highly suggestive of bilateral vestibular loss, and head impulse testing and evaluation of the VOR are warranted. Oscillopsia in these patients is not spontaneous (as it would be with nystagmus). To see the eye movements of a patient with abnormal VOR in addition to the oscillopsia, view item: https://collections.lib.utah.edu/details?id=1213435
Imaging 1, the symptom of oscillopsia with head movements (particularly while walking) is almost universally endorsed by patients with bilateral vestibular loss
Contributor Daniel R. Gold, D.O.
Publisher Spencer S. Eccles Health Sciences Library, University of Utah
Date 2017
Type Image/MovingImage
Format video/mp4
Rights Management Copyright 2017. For further information regarding the rights to this collection, please visit: https://NOVEL.utah.edu/about/copyright
Collection Neuro-ophthalmology Virtual Education Library: NOVEL http://NOVEL.utah.edu
Language eng
ARK ark:/87278/s6r53dks
Setname ehsl_novel_gold
Date Created 2017-04-04
Date Modified 2018-01-22
ID 1213442
Reference URL https://collections.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s6r53dks