Alternating host cell tropism shapes the persistence, evolution and coexistence of Epstein-Barr virus infections in human

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Publication Type Manuscript
School or College College of Science
Department Biology
Creator Adler, Frederick R.
Other Author Huynh, GiaoT.
Title Alternating host cell tropism shapes the persistence, evolution and coexistence of Epstein-Barr virus infections in human
Date 2011
Description Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infects and can persist in a majority of people worldwide. Within an infected host, EBV targets two major cell types, B cells and epithelial cells, and viruses emerging from one cell type preferentially infect the other. We use mathematical models to understand why EBV infects epithelial cells when B cells serve as a stable refuge for the virus and how switching between infecting each cell type affects virus persistence and shedding. We propose a mathematical model to describe the regulation of EBV infection within a host. This model is used to study the effects of parameter values on optimal viral strategies for trans-mission, persistence, and intrahost competition. Most often, the optimal strategy to maximize transmission is for viruses to infect epithelial cells, but the optimal strategy for maximizing intrahost competition is for viruses to mainly infect B cells. Applying the results of the within-host model, we derive a model of EBV dynamics in a homogeneous population of hosts that includes superinfection. We use this model to study the conditions necessary for invasion and coexistence of various viral strategies at the population level. When the importance of intrahost competition is weak, we show that coexistence of diff erent strategies is possible.
Type Text
Publisher Springer
Volume 73
Issue 8
First Page 1754
Last Page 1773
Language eng
Bibliographic Citation Huynh, G.T., & Adler, F. R. (2011). Alternating host cell tropism shapes the persistence, evolution and coexistence of Epstein-Barr virus infections in human. Bulletin of Mathematical Biology, 73(8), 1754-73.
Rights Management © Springer (The original publication is available at www.springerlink.com)
Format Medium application/pdf
Format Extent 2,104,290 bytes
Identifier ir-main,17067
ARK ark:/87278/s6wh3751
Setname ir_uspace
Date Created 2012-06-13
Date Modified 2021-05-06
ID 702955
Reference URL https://collections.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s6wh3751