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CreatorTitleDescriptionSubjectDate
51 McCullough, John M.Evidence for assortative mating and selection in surnames: a case from Yucatan, MexicoSurnames are often used as metaphors for genetic material on the assumption of neutrality and general immunity from systematic pressures. The Yucatec Maya use surnames of both Maya and Spanish origin. We find evidence of positive assortative mating by ethnic origin of surname and a slight bias away ...Surnames; Assortative mating; Maya1985
52 McElreath, RichardIn search of homo economicus: behavioral experiments in 15 small scale societiesRecent investigations have uncovered large, consistent deviations from the predictions of the textbook representation of Homo economicus One problem appears to lie in economists' canonical assumption that individuals are entirely self-interested: in addition to their own material payoffs, many exper...Economic behavior; Self-interest; Fairness; Reciprocity2001
53 Broughton, JohnTerminal Pleistocene fish remains from Homestead Cave, Utah, and implications for fish biogeography in the Bonneville BasinEleven fish species were identified from Homestead Cave, Utah. The remains, concentrated in the lowest stratum of the deposit, were accumulated by owls between approximately 11,200 and 10,100 14C yr B.P. and likely represent fish associated with the final die-off of the Lake Bonneville fauna. Fou...Fish assemblage; Quaternary; Lake Bonneville2000
54 O'Rourke, Dennis H.Ascertainment bias for non-twin relatives in twin proband studiesWhen families are ascertained through affected twins, as for example when twin probands are selected from a registry and their non-twin relatives studied, a correction for ascertainment bias is needed. It is shown that probandwise counting (where relatives of doubly ascertained twin pairs are counte...Genetic; Transmission; Models1982
55 O'Rourke, Dennis H.Unangan past and present: the contrasts between observed and inferred historiesAbstract Academic research focusing on the population and culture history of the Aleut (Unangan) people began in the late 19th century and continues to the present. The papers in this special issue of Human Biology summarize the latest results from archaeological, linguistic, genetic, and morphometr...2010
56 Hawkes, KristenHunting and nuclear families: some lessons from the Hadza about men's workHadza hunter-gatherers display economic and social features usually assumed to indicate the dependence of wives and children on provisioning husbands and fathers. The wives and children of better Hadza hunters have been found to be better-nourished, consistent with the assumption that men hunt to pr...Subsistence economy; Tindiga, African people; Subsistence hunting2001-10-24
57 McElreath, RichardNew methods in quantitative ethnography: economic experiments and variation in the price of equalityA new method for quantitatively documenting concerns for economic fairness has the potential for identifying variation in prosociality within and across societies. Multiple dictator games conducted in two small-scale societies presented decision makers with a choice between an equitable and an ine...Inequality; Payoffs; Prosociality2007-12
58 McElreath, RichardShared norms and the evolution of ethnic markersUnlike other primates, human populations are often divided into ethnic groups that have self-ascribed membership and are marked by seemingly arbitrary traits such as distinctive styles of dress or speech (Barth 1969, 1981). The modern understanding that ethnic identities are flexible and ethnic bou...Ethnic groups; Ethnic identity; Migration; Markers2003-02
59 Codding, Brian F.Environmental productivity predicts migration, demographic, and linguistic patterns in prehistoric CaliforniaGlobal patterns of ethnolinguistic diversity vary tremendously. Some regions show very little variation even across vast expanses, whereas others exhibit dense mosaics of different languages spoken alongside one another. Compared with the rest of Native North America, prehistoric California exemplif...Colonization of North America; Prehistoric migrations; Human behavioral ecology; Ideal free distribution; Ideal despotic distribution2013-09-03
60 Broughton, JohnHomestead cave IchthyofaunaBiological evidence on the climatic and hydrographic history of the intermountain region would be much richer, if we had more than the present dribble of paleontological data on the fishes (Hubbs and Miller, 1948, p. 25). In this passage from their landmark synthesis of historical fish biogeograph...Homestead Cave; Ichthyofauna; Lake Bonneville2000
61 Rogers, Alan R.Model of kin-structured migrationWhen individuals disperse from one local group to another, they often do so in the company of relatives. This is known as "kin-structured migration," and its effect on genetic population structure is investigated here. It is shown that when migration is kin-structured, the ratio of between- to with...Fission; Mobility; Population1987
62 O'Rourke, Dennis H.Spatial and temporal stability of mtDNA haplogroup frequencies in native North AmericaMitochondrial DNA lineage frequencies in prehistoric Aleut, eastern Utah Fremont, Southwestern Anasazi, Pyramid Lake, and Stillwater Marsh skeletal samples from northwest Nevada and the Oneota of western Illinois are compared with those in 41 contemporary aboriginal populations of North America. T...Mitochondrial DNA; Lineage variation; Haplogroup assignment2000
63 Vernon, Kenneth B.Prearchaic land use in Grass Valley, Nevada: A novel statistical implementation of optimal distribution modelingUsing Prearchaic (PA) sites in Grass Valley, NV (Fig. 1), this project investigates (i) environmental factors driving variation in PA settlement and (ii) geomorphological factors driving variation in PA surface visibility. Building on previous research [1,2], we evaluate variables using Ideal Free D...Prearchaic - Great Basin; Ideal Free Distribution; Maximum Entropy2018
64 Harpending, Henry C.Paternal age and genetic loadThe incidence of base substitutions in humans increases with the age of the father, which shows up as an increased incidence of mutational disorders in the children of older fathers. There is a less obvious implication: an extended period of high average paternal age in a population will lead to inc...2013-01-01
65 Hawkes, KristenHadza women's time allocation, offspring provisioning, and the evolution of long postmenopausal life spansExtended provisioning of offspring and long postmenopausal life spans are characteristic of all modern humans but no other primates. These traits may have evolved in tandem. Analysis of relationships between women's time allocation and children's nutritional welfare among the Hadza of northern Tanza...Child care; Children, nutrition; Life spans, Biology; Mother & child; Primates; Social structure; Women; Time Management; Hominids1997
66 Cashdan, Elizabeth A.Ethnocentrism and xenophobia: a cross-cultural studyAnalyzes the factors influencing ethnic affiliation and interethnic hostility. Relationship between intraethnic loyalty and risk of famine; Continuity of violence at different levels of groupings; Analysis of local and intercommunity conflict.Ethnic relations; Ethnology2006-06-06
67 McElreath, RichardEconomic man in cross-cultural perspective: behavioral experiments in 15 small-scale societiesSince "Selfishness examined . . ." (Caporael et al. 1989) appeared in these pages, more than 15 years ago, many additional experiments have strongly confirmed the doubts expressed by Caporael and her collaborators concerning the adequacy of self-interest as a behavioral foundation for the social sci...Economic outcomes; Selfishness; Fairness; Reciprocity2005
68 McElreath, RichardSocial learning and the maintenance of cultural variation: an evolutionary model and data from East AfricaHuman societies maintain between-group variation despite mixing of people and ideas. In order for variation to remain, migrants or their children must preferentially adopt local norms, customs, and beliefs. Yet the details of how cultural variation is maintained, despite mixing, remain unknown. This...Cultural variation; cultural identity; East Africa2004
69 Hawkes, KristenOn Human fertility: Individual or group benefit?Caldwell et al. (CA 28:25-43) have pointed to the pervasive influence of Carr-Saunders's (1922) concept of population regulation throughout two-thirds of a century of anthropology and demography.1988-01-01
70 Hawkes, KristenOn sharing and work (a comment on Bird-David)Bird-David (CA 33:25-47) discusses reasons for the persistent vitality and wide appeal of Sahlins's influential characterization of hunter-gatherers as representatives of 'original affluence."1992-01-01
71 Hawkes, KristenFamily provisioning is not the only reason men huntGurven and Hill (2009) ask, "Why do mean hunt?" As they say, "The observation that mean hunt and women gather supported the simplistic view of marriage as a cooperative enterprise. Greater sophistication suggests that males may often be motivated by mating and status rather than offspring investment...2010-01-01
72 Harpending, Henry C.; Jorde, Lynn B.Culture creates genetic structure in the Caucasus: autosomal, mitochondrial, and Y-chromosomal variation in DaghestanNear the junction of three major continents, the Caucasus region has been an important thoroughfare for human migration. While the Caucasus Mountains have diverted human traffic to the few lowland regions that provide a gateway from north to south between the Caspian and Black Seas, highland populat...Caucasus; Haplogroups; Autosomal variation; Mitochondrial variation; Y-chromosomal variation; Endogamy; Avar; Dargin; Kubachi; Culture2008
73 Rogers, Alan R.Quantitative genetics of sexual dimorphism in human body sizeA classical data set is used to predict the effect of selection on sexual dimorphism and on the population means of three characters--stature, span, and cubit--in humans. Given selection of equal intensity, the population means of stature and of cubit should respond more than 60 times as fast as d...Societies; Selection; Species1992
74 Hawkes, KristenStag hunts or rearing environments?Tomasello et al. have made the case that shared intentionality distinguishes humans from our nearest living relatives. What accounts for the difference? The answer they offer is Stag Hunt choices faced by ancestral foragers. Noting problems with that answer, I urge attention to a promising alternati...2012-01-01
75 Hawkes, KristenGrandmothers and their consequencesBoth what we share and don't share with our primate cousins make us human. Easy enough to start a list. At least since Darwin, most would rate moral sentiments as distinctively human. But our modern selves didn't emerge from ancestral apes in one step. When did populations along the way become human...2012-01-01
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