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1 AudiometryAudiometry is the measurement of the sensitivity and range of an individual's hearing. As many etiologies of imbalance, nystagmus, vertigo and/or dizziness can have an otologic origin the audiogram is an important piece of information in the evaluation of the dizzy patient. A basic audiogram (Fig. 1...
2 Vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (VEMPs)Vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials (VEMP) are electromyographic potential reflex tests that reflect the function of the saccule in cervical VEMP and the utricle in ocular VEMP.1 In the cervical VEMP an inhibitory reflex is evoked from the saccule to the sternocleidomastoid ipsilateral to the stim...
3 Testing for adduction lag in partial INO using an optokinetic stimulusIn this patient we demonstrate the use of an optokinetic stimulus to elicit an internuclear ophthalmoplegia (INO). Occasionally adduction appears to be normal with an INO, and an adduction lag with horizontal saccades should be sought as a confirmatory sign. Optokinetic tape is an easy way to assess...
4 Neuro-ophthalmic features and pseudo-MG lid signs in Miller Fisher syndrome - Figure 1This is a 51-year-old woman who presented with imbalance, acute onset dizziness and diplopia that developed over three days following two weeks of upper respiratory infection and bacterial conjunctivitis. When she was initially seen as an outpatient, nystagmus was noted to the right and left, and a ...
5 Vertical vergence and fusional amplitudeEssential information on vertical fusional vergences.
6 Superior Canal DehiscenceThis is a 60-yo-man who complained of autophony (eg, hearing his own heartbeat, noting that his own voice sounded too loud) and dizziness triggered with loud noises and straining at times. With pinched-nose Valsalva maneuver, there was downbeat-torsional (towards the right ear) nystagmus, suggestive...Image/MovingImage
7 Test Your Knowledge - Ocular tilt reaction and subjective visual verticalLesions of which of the following neuro-anatomic structures could result in the clinical findings shown? A. Right medulla B. Right interstitial nucleus of Cajal C. Right medial longitudinal fasciculus D. Left trochlear nerve E. Right caudal midbrain A. Correct. This patient presents with elements...
8 The utriculo-ocular motor pathways - physiologic and pathologic ocular tilt reaction: Physiologic ocular tilt reaction (OTR) (Figure 1)A skew deviation is a non-paralytic vertical ocular misalignment that is due to imbalance in the utriculo-ocular motor pathways. While vestibular jerk nystagmus is a consequence of static semicircular canal pathway imbalance (e.g., left-beating nystagmus due to acute right vestibular hypofunction fr...
9 Paroxysmal Ocular Tilt ReactionThis is a 60-year-old woman who 2 years prior experienced a left sided hypertensive hemorrhagic stroke, resulting in right hemiparesis, dysarthria and vertical diplopia. The initial vertical diplopia resolved completely and about 6 months following the hemorrhage the patient began to experience many...
10 The utriculo-ocular motor pathways - physiologic and pathologic ocular tilt reaction: OTR Diagram Pathologic EOMs Labelled (Figure 3)A skew deviation is a non-paralytic vertical ocular misalignment that is due to imbalance in the utriculo-ocular motor pathways. While vestibular jerk nystagmus is a consequence of static semicircular canal pathway imbalance (e.g., left-beating nystagmus due to acute right vestibular hypofunction fr...
11 The utriculo-ocular motor pathways - physiologic and pathologic ocular tilt reaction: Pathologic OTR (Figure 2)A skew deviation is a non-paralytic vertical ocular misalignment that is due to imbalance in the utriculo-ocular motor pathways. While vestibular jerk nystagmus is a consequence of static semicircular canal pathway imbalance (e.g., left-beating nystagmus due to acute right vestibular hypofunction fr...
12 Vestibular neuritis with a peripheral skew deviationThis is a 55-year-old hypertensive man who developed acute onset continuous vertigo and presented to the Emergency Department (ED) after several hours of symptoms. He was noted to have spontaneous nystagmus and had a normal brain MRI within the first 24 hours. The first portion of the video was rec...
13 Vibration-induced nystagmus in a patient with vestibular neuritisThis is a 60-year-old man who experienced the sudden onset of vertigo, oscillopsia, imbalance, nausea and vomiting. He was seen in the emergency department within hours and had spontaneous right-beating (RBN) and torsional (top poles toward right ear) nystagmus that was unidirectional in all directi...
14 The most common vestibular conditions categorized by timing and triggers, with specific historical features that should be sought for each (adapted from Approach to the Ocular Motor and Vestibular History and Examination)BPPV = benign paroxysmal positional vertigo; SCDS = superior canal dehiscence syndrome; BVL = bilateral vestibular loss; PPPD = persistent postural perceptual dizziness; MDDS = Mal de debarquement syndrome
15 Abnormal Head Impulse Test in Vestibular Neuritis 1 Week After OnsetThis is a 25-year-old woman who experienced the acute vestibular syndrome due to right-sided vestibular neuritis 1 week prior to this video. Left-beating nystagmus (LBN) was only noted in left gaze, but with fixation-removed, there was clear LBN in primary position that increased with head-shaking a...
16 Vertical semicircular canal pathwaysAnterior Canal Pathway Afferents that originate in the anterior canals (AC) of the peripheral labyrinth first synapse in the ipsilateral vestibular nucleus. Three pathways exist: 1) medial longitudinal fasciculus (MLF) - right AC afferents to right medial vestibular nucleus (MVN), decussate and asc...
17 Reversal of vertical nystagmus with convergence in anti-DPPX encephalitisThis is a man who initially presented with spontaneous upbeat and torsional nystagmus, which led to the diagnosis of anti-DPPX encephalitis (for further details on this patient's course and for a video of his nystagmus, see reference 1). Over 6-12 months, his spontaneous (mainly) upbeat nystagmus (U...
18 The most common audiovestibular laboratory tests, and the specific conditions in which they may assist in making or supporting the diagnosisVN = vestibular neuritis; VM = vestibular migraine; VP = vestibular paroxysmia; vHIT = video head impulse test; VNG = video-nystagmography; ENG = electronystagmography; VOG = video-oculography; VEMPs = vestibular evoked myogenic potentials; SCDS = superior canal dehiscence syndrome; BPPV = benign pa...
19 The most common vestibular conditions categorized by timing and triggers, with specific ocular motor and vestibular features that should be sought for eachHINTS+ = Head Impulse, Nystagmus, Test of Skew, ‘Plus' bedside assessment of auditory function; HIT = head impulse test; NP = nerve palsy; BPPV = benign paroxysmal positional vertigo; SCDS = superior canal dehiscence syndrome; BVL = bilateral vestibular loss; PPPD = persistent postural perceptual ...
20 Hyperventilation-induced downbeat nystagmus in a cerebellar disorderThis is a 45-year-old woman with a chronic progressive cerebellopathy of unclear etiology (worsening over at least 10 years) characterized by gait and limb ataxia, gaze-evoked nystagmus, saccadic pursuit and vestibulo-ocular reflex suppression, an esotropia greater at distance, along with very mild ...
21 Head-Shaking-Induced Nystagmus Following Ramsay Hunt VestibulopathyThis is a 50-year-old man who experienced the abrupt onset of imbalance, dizziness and left-sided hearing loss 4 months prior to this examination. He was found to have herpetic vesicles in the left external auditory canal and diagnosed with Ramsay Hunt syndrome. On exam (4 months after the onset), t...
22 Downbeat (perverted) head shaking nystagmus in a patient with spontaneous torsional nystagmusThis is a 75-year-old woman with vascular risk factors who experienced abrupt onset imbalance and dizziness. Symptoms were maximal at onset, and she denied progression over 6 months. Clinically, it was felt that she had suffered a stroke, although an MRI one months later demonstrated an unremarkable...
23 "Pseudonystagmus" due to bilateral vestibular loss and head tremorThis is a 65-yo-woman with complaints of imbalance, dizziness, and horizontal oscillopsia. On exam, she had a high frequency, low amplitude (mainly horizontal) head tremor, and with ophthalmoscopy, the optic nerve was clearly oscillating back and forth at the same frequency as her head tremor, which...
24 Oscillopsia and bilateral vestibular loss with gentamicin ototoxicityPatients with bilateral vestibular loss commonly experience oscillopsia with head movements, or an inability to stabilize retinal images with subsequent bouncing or jumping of the environment due to loss of vestibular function. This causes significant blurring of vision and disorientation, dizziness...Image/MovingImage
25 Monocular downbeat nystagmus due to a posterior fossa cystThis is a 40-yo-man who experienced months of imbalance and was found to have an epidermoid cyst (immediately posterior to the 4th ventricle), which was resected. Months after surgery, he experienced monocular vertical oscillopsia. On examination, there was subtle downbeat nystagmus (DBN) in the rig...Image/MovingImage
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