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1 Joint Commission International Accreditation Standards for Ambulatory CareJoint Commission International Accreditation (JCIA)This second edition of the Joint Commission International Accreditation Standards for Ambulatory Care contains all the standards, intent statements, and measurable elements of standards; accreditation policies and procedures; a glossary of key terms; and an index.
2 Facts about Ambulatory Care AccreditationJoint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations (JCAHO)The Joint Commission's Ambulatory Care Accreditation Program was established in 1975, and today more than 2,000 freestanding ambulatory care organizations are Joint Commission-accredited. These organizations generally fall into the broad categories of surgical, medical/dental and diagnostic/therapeu...
3 The Ice Pack Test For MyastheniaRyan D. Walsh, MD, Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Department of Neurology, Medical College of Wisconsin; Collin McClelland, MD, Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Neurosciences. University of MinnesotaThe ice pack test is a simple, low-tech, bedside test that can readily be applied in the outpatient clinic or hospital setting, with minimal risk or discomfort. The ice pack test is used in patients with ptosis to help support or refute a diagnosis of myasthenia. We describe how to perform and int...
4 Ectropion and EntropionJulie Falardeau, MD, Associate Professor of Ophthalmology, Casey Eye Institute, Oregon Health and Science University; Eric A. Steele, MD, Associate Professor of Ophthalmology, Casey Eye Institute, Oregon Health and Science UniversityThis is a brief powerpoint presentation describing 2 common disorders of eyelid position: ectropion and entropion. We provide the classification of these 2 disorders as well as clinical photographs
5 Pituitary Apoplexy and Hemifield Slide PhenomenonHelen H. Yeung, MD; Rudrani Banik, MD; New York Eye & Ear Infirmary of Mount Sinai, NY, NYPower point of case presentation of pituitary apoplexy. Patient presented with bilateral severe visual loss and bilateral ophthalmoplegia from partial third nerve palsies (pupil-sparing with no ptosis) from midbrain compression. After transsphenoidal surgery with decompression of mass and steroids,...
6 Pseudotumor cerebri and Chiari MalformationNicole Scripsema, MD; Rudrani Banik, MD; New York Eye & Ear Infirmary of Mount Sinai, NY, NYPower point of case presentation of pseudotumor cerebri with co-existing Chiari malformation. Management of severe visual loss associated with chronic papilledema discussed, as well as possible relationship between raised intracranial pressure from pseudotumor cerebri and Chiari malformation.
7 Best's Vittelform MaculopathyGregory P. Van Stavern, MD, Associate Professor, Ophthalmology & Visual Sciences and Neurology, Washington University School of MedicineThis 14 year old presented with decreased vision, headaches and central scotomas. She was found to have bilateral papilledema related to IIH and also Best's vitilliform maculopathy. The maculas are commonly described as having a "fried egg" sunny side up appearance.
8 Acute Retinal Necrosis (ARN)Gregory P. Van Stavern, MD, Associate Professor, Ophthalmology & Visual Sciences and Neurology, Washington University School of MedicineAcute Retinal Necrosis causes inflammation and subsequent retinal detachment. This powerpoint provides images depicting ARN.
9 Retinitis PigmentosaGregory P. Van Stavern, MD, Associate Professor, Ophthalmology & Visual Sciences and Neurology, Washington University School of MedicineRetinitis pigmentosa is a retinal/choroidal degeneration caused by various genetic defects. The term retinitis pigmentosa is really a misnomer since it is not inflammation (retinitis) and it is not a disease of the pigmentary system (pigmentosa).
10 Stargardt's DiseaseGregory P. Van Stavern, MD, Associate Professor, Ophthalmology & Visual Sciences and Neurology, Washington University School of MedicineStargardt's disease is an inherited maculopathy which frequently presents with a loss of central vision.
11 BirdshotGregory P. Van Stavern, MD, Associate Professor, Ophthalmology & Visual Sciences and Neurology, Washington University School of MedicineBirdshot Retinochoroidopathy is a posterior uveitis seen in women 30-60 years of age who present with floaters, changes in color vision, and difficulty with night vision.
12 HistoplasmosisGregory P. Van Stavern, MD, Associate Professor, Ophthalmology & Visual Sciences and Neurology, Washington University School of MedicineHistoplasmosis, a fungus, can present acutely as a systemic condition. This image shows signs of Histoplasmosis.
13 Acute Multifocal Pigment Epithelium Epitheliopathy (AMPEE)Gregory P. Van Stavern, MD, Associate Professor, Ophthalmology & Visual Sciences and Neurology, Washington University School of MedicineImages providing example of Acute Multifocal Pigment Epithelium Epitheliopathy (AMPEE)
14 Congenital and Secondary SyphilisGregory P. Van Stavern, MD, Associate Professor, Ophthalmology & Visual Sciences and Neurology, Washington University School of MedicineImages showing evideince of Congenital and Secondary Syphilis
15 Multifocal ChoroiditisGregory P. Van Stavern, MD, Associate Professor, Ophthalmology & Visual Sciences and Neurology, Washington University School of MedicineMulti-focal choroiditis is usually a bilateral choroidopathy seen more frequently in women associated with punched out appearing lesions occasionally with pigment around the edges. Image provides example.
16 Acute zonal occult outer retinopathy (AZOOR) versus multiple evanescent white dot syndrome (MEWDS)Asim V. Farooq, MD University of Chicago Medicine, Michael T. Andreoli, MD, Wheaton Eye Clinic, Heather E. Moss, MD, Department of Ophthalmology & Visual Sciences, University of Illinois at Chicago College of MedicinePPT case report on acute zonal occult outer retinopathy (AZOOR) versus multiple evanescent white dot syndrome (MEWDS).
17 Idiopathic bilateral neuroretinitis in a childAsim V. Farooq, MD University of Chicago Medicine; Michael T. Andreoli, MD, Wheaton Eye Clinic; Molly Gilbert, MD, James A. Lovell Federal Health Care Center; Heather E. Moss, MD, Department of Ophthalmology & Visual Sciences, University of Illinois at Chicago College of MedicinePPT case describing idiopathic bilateral neuroretinitis in a child.
18 Superonasal Transconjunctival Optic Nerve Sheath Decompression: A Modified Surgical Technique Without Extraocular Muscle DisinsertionKevin E. Lai, MD, Dean McGee Eye Institute, Department of Ophthalmology, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK, Neuro-Ophthalmology Institute, Indianapolis, IN; Kenneth C. Lao, MD, Dean McGee Eye Institute, Department of Ophthalmology, University of Oklahoma Health Science...Report on the surgical technique and outcomes of a modified medial transconjunctival approach to optic nerve sheath decompression (ONSD) in 15 patients. Supplemental Digital Content : Video that demonstrates the stONSD procedure. m4v: http://content.lib.utah.edu/cdm/ref/collection/EHSL-NOVEL/id/22...
19 Superonasal Transconjunctival Optic Nerve Sheath Decompression (stONSD)Kevin E. Lai, MD, Dean McGee Eye Institute, Department of Ophthalmology, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK, Neuro-Ophthalmology Institute, Indianapolis, IN; Kenneth C. Lao, MD, Dean McGee Eye Institute, Department of Ophthalmology, University of Oklahoma Health Science...This video demonstrates the surgical technique and outcomes of a modified medial transconjunctival approach to optic nerve sheath decompression (ONSD).
20 What is White? Normal white structuresGregory P. Van Stavern, MD, Associate Professor, Ophthalmology & Visual Sciences and Neurology, Washington University School of MedicineThe only inherently "white" element in the normal eye is the sclera.
21 Serpiginous ChoroidopathyGregory P. Van Stavern, MD, Associate Professor, Ophthalmology & Visual Sciences and Neurology, Washington University School of MedicineSerpiginous choroidopathy (also known as Geographic choroidopathy) usually affects the choroid, the choriocapillaris and the retinal pigment epithelium in both eyes.
22 White Dot Syndromes: MEWDS, AZOOR, AIBSEGregory P. Van Stavern, MD, Associate Professor, Ophthalmology & Visual Sciences and Neurology, Washington University School of Medicine
23 Vogt Koyanagi-Harada (VKH) SyndromeGregory P. Van Stavern, MD, Associate Professor, Ophthalmology & Visual Sciences and Neurology, Washington University School of MedicineVogt-Koyanagi disease causes bilateral uveitis, along with alopecia, vitiligo, and hearing loss.
24 Pars PlanitisGregory P. Van Stavern, MD, Associate Professor, Ophthalmology & Visual Sciences and Neurology, Washington University School of MedicinePars planitis is an inflammatory condition seen in children and young adults. It is associated with inflammation of the pars plana--at the far periphery of the retina.
25 RefractionSean Gratton, MD, Sabates Eye CenterAn introduction to refraction.
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