1 - 25 of 2,454
Number of results to display per page
TitleCreatorDescription
1 Clinical Characteristics of Ocular LateropulsionJorge C Kattah, MD, Illinois Neurologic Institute, Univ of Illinois College of MedicineA discussion of the normal mechanism that maintain the eyes in normal horizontal position.
2 Dual visual field Defect (quadrantanopia and central scotoma) Unmasks the Hidden Brain lesion in a patient with Non-arteritic ischemic optic neuropathyA. Mohan Kannam; Fellow, Academy of Education, Department of Pediatric Ophthalmology, Strabismus, and Neuro-ophthalmology; Child Sight Institute, Nimmagada Prasad Children's Eye Care Centre, L V Prasad Eye Institute, GMRV Campus, Andhra Pradesh, India; B. Rajat Kapoor; Consultant, Department of Pedi...This submission is an interesting case that highlights the co-existence of two different visual field defects in the same patient presenting to us with clinical picture of non arteritic ischemic optic neuropathy. The correct interpretation of the visual field defects led to the appropriate localizat...
3 Thyroid Eye Disease (Japanese)NANOSThis is an autoimmune condition where your body's immune system is producing factors that stimulate enlargement of the muscles that move the eye.
4 Thyroid Eye Disease_ItalianThis is an autoimmune condition where your body's immune system is producing factors that stimulate enlargement of the muscles that move the eye.
5 Thyroid Eye Disease_TeluguThis is an autoimmune condition where your body's immune system is producing factors that stimulate enlargement of the muscles that move the eye.
6 Stereo Acuity Testing for Non-physiologic Visual LossWalsh and Hoyt Clinical Neuro-Ophthalmology, 6th Edition; Omar Ozgur, MD; Rudrani Banik, MD; François-Xavier BorruatDescription of stereo acuity for non-physiologic visual loss.
7 Hemifacial SpasmShirley H. Wray, M.D., Ph.D., FRCP, Professor of Neurology Harvard Medical School, Director, Unit for Neurovisual Disorders, Massachusetts General HospitalThe patient is a 72 year old man with myopia, childhood exotropia, progressive age related ptosis and right hemifacial spasm. Hemifacial spasm (HS) most often begins insidiously in the orbicularis oculi muscle in the early stages, as in this man. He presented with a 2 year history of involuntary twi...
8 Introduction to Neurological ImagingDevin Mackay, MD, Assistant Professor of Clinical Neurology, Director of Neuro-ophthalmology, Indiana UniversityIntroduction to the techniques of neurological imaging examination.
9 Radiological Examination of the Visual SystemJohn Pula, MD; NorthShore University; Glenview, IL
10 Finger to Nose PerimetryJohn Pula, MD, NorthShore University Health SystemA description of the use of the finger to nose perimetry test is covered.
11 Ocular Fundus ExaminationDevin D. Mackay, MD, Director of Neuro-Ophthalmology, Assistant Clinical Professor of Neurology, Ophthalmology, and Neurosurgery, Indiana University School of Medicine; Valérie Biousse, MD, Departments of Ophthalmology and Neurology, Emory University School of MedicineExplanation of using the direct ophthalmoscope in examinations.
12 Fundus PhotographyDevin D. Mackay, MD, Director of Neuro-Ophthalmology, Assistant Clinical Professor of Neurology, Ophthalmology, and Neurosurgery, Indiana University School of Medicine; Valérie Biousse, MD, Departments of Ophthalmology and Neurology, Emory University School of MedicineExplanation of using fundus photography in examinations.
13 Slit Lamp BinocularDevin D. Mackay, MD, Director of Neuro-Ophthalmology, Assistant Clinical Professor of Neurology, Ophthalmology, and Neurosurgery, Indiana University School of Medicine; Valérie Biousse, MD, Departments of Ophthalmology and Neurology, Emory University School of MedicineDescription of the slit lamp binocular examination.
14 Indirect OphthalmoscopeDevin D. Mackay, MD, Director of Neuro-Ophthalmology, Assistant Clinical Professor of Neurology, Ophthalmology, and Neurosurgery, Indiana University School of Medicine; Valérie Biousse, MD, Departments of Ophthalmology and Neurology, Emory University School of MedicineExplanation of using the indirect ophthalmoscope in examinations.
15 Contrast SensitivitySean Gratton, M.D., Neurology and Ophthalmology, University of Missouri, Kansas CityExplanation of contrast sensitivity.
16 The Ocular Examination of the Comatose PatientJohn Pula, MD; NorthShore University; Glenview, ILDescription of conducting an ocular examination of a comatose patient.
17 Panoptic OphthalmoscopeAmrita D. Vuppala, MD, Assistant Professor, Neurology and Ophthalmology, University of Nebraska Medical CenterDemonstration of using the panoptic ophthalmoscope in examinations.
18 Eye Drop Instillation: Technique & IndicationsKarl C. Golnik, MD, Departments of Ophthalmology, Neurology & Neurosurgery, University of Cincinnati & The Cincinnati Eye InstituteDescription and demonstration of eye drop instillation.
19 The Ice Pack Test For MyastheniaRyan D. Walsh, MD, Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Department of Neurology, Medical College of Wisconsin; Collin McClelland, MD, Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Neurosciences. University of MinnesotaThe ice pack test is a simple, low-tech, bedside test that can readily be applied in the outpatient clinic or hospital setting, with minimal risk or discomfort. The ice pack test is used in patients with ptosis to help support or refute a diagnosis of myasthenia. We describe how to perform and int...
20 Ectropion and EntropionJulie Falardeau, MD, Associate Professor of Ophthalmology, Casey Eye Institute, Oregon Health and Science University; Eric A. Steele, MD, Associate Professor of Ophthalmology, Casey Eye Institute, Oregon Health and Science UniversityThis is a brief powerpoint presentation describing 2 common disorders of eyelid position: ectropion and entropion. We provide the classification of these 2 disorders as well as clinical photographs
21 Pituitary Apoplexy and Hemifield Slide PhenomenonHelen H. Yeung, MD; Rudrani Banik, MD; New York Eye & Ear Infirmary of Mount Sinai, NY, NYPower point of case presentation of pituitary apoplexy. Patient presented with bilateral severe visual loss and bilateral ophthalmoplegia from partial third nerve palsies (pupil-sparing with no ptosis) from midbrain compression. After transsphenoidal surgery with decompression of mass and steroids,...
22 Pseudotumor cerebri and Chiari MalformationNicole Scripsema, MD; Rudrani Banik, MD; New York Eye & Ear Infirmary of Mount Sinai, NY, NYPower point of case presentation of pseudotumor cerebri with co-existing Chiari malformation. Management of severe visual loss associated with chronic papilledema discussed, as well as possible relationship between raised intracranial pressure from pseudotumor cerebri and Chiari malformation.
23 Best's Vittelform MaculopathyGregory P. Van Stavern, MD, Associate Professor, Ophthalmology & Visual Sciences and Neurology, Washington University School of MedicineThis 14 year old presented with decreased vision, headaches and central scotomas. She was found to have bilateral papilledema related to IIH and also Best's vitilliform maculopathy. The maculas are commonly described as having a "fried egg" sunny side up appearance.
24 Acute Retinal Necrosis (ARN)Gregory P. Van Stavern, MD, Associate Professor, Ophthalmology & Visual Sciences and Neurology, Washington University School of MedicineAcute Retinal Necrosis causes inflammation and subsequent retinal detachment. This powerpoint provides images depicting ARN.
25 Retinitis PigmentosaGregory P. Van Stavern, MD, Associate Professor, Ophthalmology & Visual Sciences and Neurology, Washington University School of MedicineRetinitis pigmentosa is a retinal/choroidal degeneration caused by various genetic defects. The term retinitis pigmentosa is really a misnomer since it is not inflammation (retinitis) and it is not a disease of the pigmentary system (pigmentosa).
1 - 25 of 2,454