1 - 25 of 109
Number of results to display per page
CreatorTitleDescriptionSubjectDate
1 Macfarlan, ShaneMale Survival Advantage on the Baja California PeninsulaA consistent finding from contemporary Western societies is that women outlive men. However, what is unclear is whether sex differences in survival are constant across varying socio-ecological conditions. We test the universality of the female survival advantage with mortality data from a nineteenth...ecology; health and disease and epidemiology; behaviour2020
2 O'Connell, James F.A Different Paradigm for the Initial Colonisation of Sahul: Archaeological, genetic, demographic and geographic perspectivesThe questions of when and how humans reached Sahul, the Pleistocene continent of Australia and New Guinea, has remained a central issue of Australian archaeology since its development as an academic discipline in the mid-twentieth century. Additionally, this has been a dominant theme linking Austral...Sahul; Wallacea; colonisation; isolation; genomics; mitochondrial DNA2019-08-20
3 Vernon, Kenneth B.Prearchaic land use in Grass Valley, Nevada: A novel statistical implementation of optimal distribution modelingUsing Prearchaic (PA) sites in Grass Valley, NV (Fig. 1), this project investigates (i) environmental factors driving variation in PA settlement and (ii) geomorphological factors driving variation in PA surface visibility. Building on previous research [1,2], we evaluate variables using Ideal Free D...Prearchaic - Great Basin; Ideal Free Distribution; Maximum Entropy2018
4 Yaworsky, Peter M.Archaeological Potential of the Grand Staircase-Escalante National MonumentExecutive proclamation 9682 reduces the size of the Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument (GSENM), removing protections for at least 2,000 known archaeological sites and an unknown number of undiscovered cultural properties. Because only 10% of the GSENM's 1.9 million acres has been inventorie...Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument; Anthropology-Research2018
5 Vernon, Kenneth B.Numic fires: modeling the effects of anthropogenic fire on foraging decisions in the Great BasinAcross Western North America, hunter-gatherers modified their surrounding environment with the application of fire (1; 11; 15). However, to date we lack a general theoretical framework to investigate the reasons why people would burn or its effects on traditional foraging economies. To begin to fill...Behavioral ecology; Diet; Fire2015
6 Codding, Brian F.Prearchaic Adaptations in the Central Great Basin: Preliminary findings from a stratified open-air site in Grass Valley, NevadaEarly Holocene occupants of the Great Basin preferentially occupied highly productive habitats surrounding pluvial lakes. While growing evidence details in the adaptations of these Prearchaic foragers in the Eastern (e.g., Madsen et al. 2015) and Western Great Basin (e.g., Jenkins et al. 2012), our...Anthropology, Cultural - methods - United States; Anthropology, Cultural - methods - Great Basin; Anthropology - Grass Valley, Nevada2016
7 Hawkes, KristenOn Human fertility: Individual or group benefit?Caldwell et al. (CA 28:25-43) have pointed to the pervasive influence of Carr-Saunders's (1922) concept of population regulation throughout two-thirds of a century of anthropology and demography.1988-01-01
8 Hawkes, KristenOn optimal foraging models and subsistence transitionsLayton, Foley, and Williams are right: "progress" doesn't explain transitions from hunting and gathering to agriculture, by theory and models from behavioral ecology might.1992-01-01
9 Hawkes, KristenOn sharing and work (a comment on Bird-David)Bird-David (CA 33:25-47) discusses reasons for the persistent vitality and wide appeal of Sahlins's influential characterization of hunter-gatherers as representatives of 'original affluence."1992-01-01
10 Hawkes, KristenOn why male foragers hunt and share food: Reply to Hill and KaplanMy argument is this: Some food resources, notably large animals when they are unpredictably acquired, are too expensive to defend. Other can claim shares of them without repaying shares of the same foods later.1993-01-01
11 Hawkes, KristenFamily provisioning is not the only reason men huntGurven and Hill (2009) ask, "Why do mean hunt?" As they say, "The observation that mean hunt and women gather supported the simplistic view of marriage as a cooperative enterprise. Greater sophistication suggests that males may often be motivated by mating and status rather than offspring investment...2010-01-01
12 Codding, BrianShellfishing and the colonization of sahul: a multivariate model evaluating the dynamic effects of prey utility, transport considerations and life-history on foraging patterns and midden compositionArchaeological evidence of shellfish exploitation along the coast of Sahul (Pleistocene Australia-New Guinea) points to an apparent paradox. While the continental record as a whole suggests that human populations were very low from initial colonization through early Holocene, coastal and peri-c...2014-01-01
13 Codding, BrianBehavioral ecology and the future of archaeological scienceThe future of archaeological science relies as much (if not more) on theoretical as on methodological developments. As with anything in biology, explaining past human behavior will require the application of evolutionary theory. As with anything in archaeology, theory is useless without clear ties t...2015-01-01
14 Codding, BrianConservation or co-evolution? Intermediate levels of aboriginal burning and hunting have positive effects on kangaroo populations in Western AustraliaStudies of conservation in small scale societies typically portray indigenous peoples as either sustainably managing resources, or forsaking long-term sustainability for short-term gains. To explain this variability, we propose an alternative framework derived from a co-evolutionary perspective. In ...2014-01-01
15 Hawkes, KristenOn life history evolution (a comment on Chisholm)Chisholm (CA 34:I-24) is right that the theory, models, and data of evolutionary biology apply to questions asked by social scientists. Work in life-history theory (Stearns 1992, Roff 1992, Charnov 1993) has especially provocative implications for the understanding of human development (see review i...1994-01-01
16 Hawkes, KristenLife history theory and human evolution : a chronicle of ideas and findingsFertility ends at similar ages in women and female chimpanzees, but humans usually live longer and mature later. We also differ from our closest living relatives in weaning infants before they can feed themselves. The comparisons pose questions about when and why the distinctively human life history...2006-01-01
17 Hawkes, KristenThe derived features of human life historyThis chapter compares and contrasts the life histories of extant great apes in order to construct a hypothetical life history of the last common ancestor of all great apes and to identify features of human life history that have been derived during the evolution of our lineage. Data compiled from th...2006-01-01
18 Hawkes, KristenGrandmothers and their consequencesBoth what we share and don't share with our primate cousins make us human. Easy enough to start a list. At least since Darwin, most would rate moral sentiments as distinctively human. But our modern selves didn't emerge from ancestral apes in one step. When did populations along the way become human...2012-01-01
19 Hawkes, KristenStag hunts or rearing environments?Tomasello et al. have made the case that shared intentionality distinguishes humans from our nearest living relatives. What accounts for the difference? The answer they offer is Stag Hunt choices faced by ancestral foragers. Noting problems with that answer, I urge attention to a promising alternati...2012-01-01
20 Codding, BrianAlternative aboriginal economies: Martu livelihoods in the 21st centuryIn the western deserts of Australia, hunting and gathering endures as an important social and economic activity. That foraging persists within the boundaries of developed industrialized nation states may come as a surprise to those who evaluate foraging as less profitable than agricultural, wage or ...Aboriginal economics; Aboriginal foraging2015
21 Codding, BrianCodding, Brian: Living outside the box: An updated perspective on diet breadth and sexual division of labor in the Prearchaic Great Basin [Author's Manuscript]A tremendous amount has been learned about the Prearchaic (before 9000 BP) Great Basin since we advocated a perspective of sexual division of labor based on Human Behavioral Ecology a decade ago. Many investigators have taken our advice and a few have challenged our assumptions and inferences. One o...2014-01-01
22 Bell, AdrianDriving factors in the colonization of Oceania: developing island-level statistical models to test competing hypotheses (Electronic Supporting Material)To test the model specification and fitting algorithms, we simulated data using randomly generated parameters, settlement chronology, and accessibility matrix for N islands. Using the function optim in R, we found the maximum likelihood estimates and compared them with the "true" parameter values us...Oceania; Archaeology; Settlement; Statistical models2015-01-23
23 Codding, Brian F.Explaining prehistoric variation in the abundance of large prey: a zooarchaeological analysis of deer and rabbit hunting along the Pecho Coast of Central CaliforniaThree main hypotheses are commonly employed to explain diachronic variation in the relative abun dance of remains of large terrestrial herbivores: (1) large prey populations decline as a function of anthro pogenic overexploitation; (2 ) large prey tends to increase as a result of increasing social p...Foraging; Resource depression; Prestige hunting; Paleoclimatic variability; Human behavioral ecology; Zooarchaeology; Central California2009-11-14
24 Codding, Brian F.Interpreting abundance indices: some zooarchaeological implications of Martu foragingIndices of taxonomic abundance are commonly used by zooarchaeologists to examine resource inten sification, overexploitation and gender divisions in foraging labor. The original formulation of abundance indices developed a clear interpretive framework by linking the measure with foraging models from...Human behavioral ecology; Zooarchaeology; Ethnoarchaeology; Resource intensification; Gender division of labor; Western Australia2010-07-20
25 Codding, Brian F.A land of work: foraging behavior and ecologyWork is a core theme in many of the major issues and debates in California archaeology. Work is central in understanding why the first Californians entered the region (e.g., Erlandson, this volume): how thousands of years of work following colonization resulted in the overexploitation of particular ...Human behavioral ecology; Hunter-gatherer; North America: California2012-03-15
1 - 25 of 109