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CreatorTitleDescriptionSubjectDate
1 Laurence Loeb slides
2 Hadza scavenging: implications for Plio/Pleistocene Hominid subsistenceThe frequent association of stone tools and large animal bones in African Plio/Pleistocene archaeological sites has long been taken as evidence of the importance of hunting in early hominid diets. Many now argue that it reflects hominid scavenging, not hunting.Hadza; Scavenging; Plio/Pleistocene; Hominid Diet1988-04
3 A land of work: foraging behavior and ecologyWork is a core theme in many of the major issues and debates in California archaeology. Work is central in understanding why the first Californians entered the region (e.g., Erlandson, this volume): how thousands of years of work following colonization resulted in the overexploitation of particular ...Human behavioral ecology; Hunter-gatherer; North America: California2012-03-15
4 Explaining prehistoric variation in the abundance of large prey: a zooarchaeological analysis of deer and rabbit hunting along the Pecho Coast of Central CaliforniaThree main hypotheses are commonly employed to explain diachronic variation in the relative abun dance of remains of large terrestrial herbivores: (1) large prey populations decline as a function of anthro pogenic overexploitation; (2 ) large prey tends to increase as a result of increasing social p...Foraging; Resource depression; Prestige hunting; Paleoclimatic variability; Human behavioral ecology; Zooarchaeology; Central California2009-11-14
5 Interpreting abundance indices: some zooarchaeological implications of Martu foragingIndices of taxonomic abundance are commonly used by zooarchaeologists to examine resource inten sification, overexploitation and gender divisions in foraging labor. The original formulation of abundance indices developed a clear interpretive framework by linking the measure with foraging models from...Human behavioral ecology; Zooarchaeology; Ethnoarchaeology; Resource intensification; Gender division of labor; Western Australia2010-07-20
6 The molecular clockThe molecular clock uses evolutionary changes in proteins and DNA to measure the passage of time. Yet molecular evolution is clocklike only to a first approximation. Uncertainties arise because of variation in rates of molecular evolution, because of difficulty in calibrating clocks, and because we ...2013-01-01
7 Genetic evidence for a Pleistocene population explosionExpansions of population size leave characteristic signatures in mitochondrial "mismatch distributions." Consequently, these distributions can inform us about the history of changes in population size. Here, I study a simple model of population history that assumes that, t generations before the pr...1995
8 Are peasants risk-averse decision makers?For decades, researchers studying small-scale, subsistence-oriented farmers have sought to explain why these "peasants" seem slow to acquire new technologies, novel agricultural practices, and new ideas from the larger societies that have engulfed them. The early work on this question suggested that...Subsistance farmers; Risk-aversion; Risk-taking; Cultural conservatism; Cost-benefit analysis2002
9 Biochemical heterozygosity and morphologic variation in a colony of papio hamadryas hamadryas baboonsThis analysis examines the association between genetic heterozygosity and individual morphologic variation in a captive population of Papio hamadryas hamadryas consisting of 403 juveniles and adults. The population structure of the colony was artificially generated and maintained and is thus rigoro...Population genetics; Polygenic; Inbreeding1994
10 Behavioral ecology and the future of archaeological scienceThe future of archaeological science relies as much (if not more) on theoretical as on methodological developments. As with anything in biology, explaining past human behavior will require the application of evolutionary theory. As with anything in archaeology, theory is useless without clear ties t...2015-01-01
11 Shellfishing and the colonization of sahul: a multivariate model evaluating the dynamic effects of prey utility, transport considerations and life-history on foraging patterns and midden compositionArchaeological evidence of shellfish exploitation along the coast of Sahul (Pleistocene Australia-New Guinea) points to an apparent paradox. While the continental record as a whole suggests that human populations were very low from initial colonization through early Holocene, coastal and peri-c...2014-01-01
12 Fish remains dominate Barn Owl pellets in northwestern NevadaThe foraging ecology of the Barn Owl (Tytoalba) has been studied extensively, both in the New World (Marti 1988, Castro and Jaksic 1995, Van Vuren and Moore 1998, and others) and the Old World (Glue 1967, Yom-Tov and Wool 1997, and others). Small rodents, insectivores, and small birds are generally ...Barn Owl pellets; Northwestern Nevada; Fish; Fish remains2006
13 Origins and affinities of modern humans: a comparison of mitochondrial and nuclear genetic dataTo test hypotheses about the origin of modern humans, we analyzed mtDNA sequences, 30 nuclear restriction-site polymorphisms (RSPs), and 30 tetranucleotide short tandem repeat (STR) polymorphisms in 243 Africans, Asians, and Europeans. An evolutionary tree based on mtDNA displays deep African branch...Base Sequence; Variation (Genetics); Base Sequence1995
14 Driving factors in the colonization of Oceania: developing island-level statistical models to test competing hypotheses (Electronic Supporting Material)To test the model specification and fitting algorithms, we simulated data using randomly generated parameters, settlement chronology, and accessibility matrix for N islands. Using the function optim in R, we found the maximum likelihood estimates and compared them with the "true" parameter values us...Oceania; Archaeology; Settlement; Statistical models2015-01-23
15 Codding, Brian: Living outside the box: An updated perspective on diet breadth and sexual division of labor in the Prearchaic Great Basin [Author's Manuscript]A tremendous amount has been learned about the Prearchaic (before 9000 BP) Great Basin since we advocated a perspective of sexual division of labor based on Human Behavioral Ecology a decade ago. Many investigators have taken our advice and a few have challenged our assumptions and inferences. One o...2014-01-01
16 Sex differences in aggression: what does evolutionary theory predict?The target article claims that evolutionary theory predicts the emergence of sex differences in aggression in early childhood, and that there will be no sex difference in anger. It also finds an absence of sex differences in spousal abuse in Western societies. All three are puzzling from an evolutio...2009-08
17 Why is testosterone associated with divorce in men?There is evidence that in women high levels of testosterone are associated with more sexual partners and more permissive sexual attitudes. If a similar relationship holds true for men, the higher basal testosterone levels of divorced and unmarried men may be caused by this relationship rather than b...Marriage; Separation; Hormones; Sexuality1998-06
18 Founder effect: assessment of variation in genetic contributions among foundersWe present a Monte Carlo method for determining the distribution of founders' genetic contributions to descendant cohorts. The simulation of genes through known pedigrees generates the probability distributions of contributed genes in recent cohorts of descendants, their means, and their variances.1994
19 Introduction: origins and settlement of the indigenous populations of the Aleutian ArchipelagoThe series of papers in this special issue of Human Biology use an interdisciplinary approach to address regional questions and to integrate disparate Aleutian data into a broad, synthetic effort. The contributors leverage decades of data on Aleut origins, biogeography, and behavior through integrat...2010
20 Quantitative genetics of sexual dimorphism in human body sizeA classical data set is used to predict the effect of selection on sexual dimorphism and on the population means of three characters--stature, span, and cubit--in humans. Given selection of equal intensity, the population means of stature and of cubit should respond more than 60 times as fast as d...Societies; Selection; Species1992
21 Stag hunts or rearing environments?Tomasello et al. have made the case that shared intentionality distinguishes humans from our nearest living relatives. What accounts for the difference? The answer they offer is Stag Hunt choices faced by ancestral foragers. Noting problems with that answer, I urge attention to a promising alternati...2012-01-01
22 Grandmothers and their consequencesBoth what we share and don't share with our primate cousins make us human. Easy enough to start a list. At least since Darwin, most would rate moral sentiments as distinctively human. But our modern selves didn't emerge from ancestral apes in one step. When did populations along the way become human...2012-01-01
23 The derived features of human life historyThis chapter compares and contrasts the life histories of extant great apes in order to construct a hypothetical life history of the last common ancestor of all great apes and to identify features of human life history that have been derived during the evolution of our lineage. Data compiled from th...2006-01-01
24 Life history theory and human evolution : a chronicle of ideas and findingsFertility ends at similar ages in women and female chimpanzees, but humans usually live longer and mature later. We also differ from our closest living relatives in weaning infants before they can feed themselves. The comparisons pose questions about when and why the distinctively human life history...2006-01-01
25 Resource intensification and late Holocene human impacts on Pacific coast bird populations: evidence from the Emeryville shellmound avifaunaAnthropologists and conservation biologists have commonly assumed that the distributions and abundances of vertebrate resources recorded during the early historic period in North America reflected a "pristine" condition. This view follows from the perception that Native American population densities...Resource intensification; Holocene human impacts; Foraging efficiency; Harvest pressure; Bird populations; Emeryville shellmound2001
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