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CreatorTitleDescriptionSubjectDate
1 O'Rourke, Dennis H.Refutation of the general single locus model for the etiology of schizophreniaAll published studies on the familial incidence of schizophrenia appropriate for testing the applicability of the general single-locus two-allele model are examined under the assumption of a unitary etiology for all schizophrenia. We show that the single major locus model is inadequate to predict th...Genetics; Diseases in Twins; Chromosome Mapping1982
2 Rogers, Alan R.Doubts about isonymyThe method of isonymy, developed by Crow and Mange for estimating inbreeding from surname frequencies, requires an assumption that has not been appreciated: It is necessary to assume that all males in some ancestral generation, the founding stock, had unique surnames. Because this assumption is sel...1991
3 Rogers, Alan R.Migration and genetic drift in human populationsIn humans and many other species, mortality is concentrated early in the life cycle, and is low during the ages of dispersal and reproduction. Yet precisely the opposite is assumed by classical population-genetics models of migration and genetic drift. We introduce a model in which population regul...Frequencies; Variance; Dynamics1986
4 Rogers, Alan R.; Jorde, Lynn B.Ascertainment bias in estimates of average heterozygosityPopulation geneticists work with a nonrandom sample of the human genome. Conventional practice ensures that unusually variable loci are most likely to be discovered and thus included in the sample of loci. Consequently, estimates of average heterozygosity are biased upward. In what follows we descri...Bias (Epidemiology); Biometry; Heterozygote1996-05
5 Cashdan, Elizabeth A.Sex differences in aggression: what does evolutionary theory predict?The target article claims that evolutionary theory predicts the emergence of sex differences in aggression in early childhood, and that there will be no sex difference in anger. It also finds an absence of sex differences in spousal abuse in Western societies. All three are puzzling from an evolutio...2009-08
6 Hawkes, KristenHadza scavenging: implications for Plio/Pleistocene Hominid subsistenceThe frequent association of stone tools and large animal bones in African Plio/Pleistocene archaeological sites has long been taken as evidence of the importance of hunting in early hominid diets. Many now argue that it reflects hominid scavenging, not hunting.Hadza; Scavenging; Plio/Pleistocene; Hominid Diet1988-04
7 Codding, Brian F.A land of work: foraging behavior and ecologyWork is a core theme in many of the major issues and debates in California archaeology. Work is central in understanding why the first Californians entered the region (e.g., Erlandson, this volume): how thousands of years of work following colonization resulted in the overexploitation of particular ...Human behavioral ecology; Hunter-gatherer; North America: California2012-03-15
8 Codding, Brian F.Explaining prehistoric variation in the abundance of large prey: a zooarchaeological analysis of deer and rabbit hunting along the Pecho Coast of Central CaliforniaThree main hypotheses are commonly employed to explain diachronic variation in the relative abun dance of remains of large terrestrial herbivores: (1) large prey populations decline as a function of anthro pogenic overexploitation; (2 ) large prey tends to increase as a result of increasing social p...Foraging; Resource depression; Prestige hunting; Paleoclimatic variability; Human behavioral ecology; Zooarchaeology; Central California2009-11-14
9 Codding, Brian F.Interpreting abundance indices: some zooarchaeological implications of Martu foragingIndices of taxonomic abundance are commonly used by zooarchaeologists to examine resource inten sification, overexploitation and gender divisions in foraging labor. The original formulation of abundance indices developed a clear interpretive framework by linking the measure with foraging models from...Human behavioral ecology; Zooarchaeology; Ethnoarchaeology; Resource intensification; Gender division of labor; Western Australia2010-07-20
10 Rogers, Alan R.The molecular clockThe molecular clock uses evolutionary changes in proteins and DNA to measure the passage of time. Yet molecular evolution is clocklike only to a first approximation. Uncertainties arise because of variation in rates of molecular evolution, because of difficulty in calibrating clocks, and because we ...2013-01-01
11 Codding, Brian F.Environmental productivity predicts migration, demographic, and linguistic patterns in prehistoric CaliforniaGlobal patterns of ethnolinguistic diversity vary tremendously. Some regions show very little variation even across vast expanses, whereas others exhibit dense mosaics of different languages spoken alongside one another. Compared with the rest of Native North America, prehistoric California exemplif...Colonization of North America; Prehistoric migrations; Human behavioral ecology; Ideal free distribution; Ideal despotic distribution2013-09-03
12 Broughton, JohnHomestead cave IchthyofaunaBiological evidence on the climatic and hydrographic history of the intermountain region would be much richer, if we had more than the present dribble of paleontological data on the fishes (Hubbs and Miller, 1948, p. 25). In this passage from their landmark synthesis of historical fish biogeograph...Homestead Cave; Ichthyofauna; Lake Bonneville2000
13 Rogers, Alan R.Model of kin-structured migrationWhen individuals disperse from one local group to another, they often do so in the company of relatives. This is known as "kin-structured migration," and its effect on genetic population structure is investigated here. It is shown that when migration is kin-structured, the ratio of between- to with...Fission; Mobility; Population1987
14 O'Rourke, Dennis H.Spatial and temporal stability of mtDNA haplogroup frequencies in native North AmericaMitochondrial DNA lineage frequencies in prehistoric Aleut, eastern Utah Fremont, Southwestern Anasazi, Pyramid Lake, and Stillwater Marsh skeletal samples from northwest Nevada and the Oneota of western Illinois are compared with those in 41 contemporary aboriginal populations of North America. T...Mitochondrial DNA; Lineage variation; Haplogroup assignment2000
15 Codding, BrianBehavioral ecology and the future of archaeological scienceThe future of archaeological science relies as much (if not more) on theoretical as on methodological developments. As with anything in biology, explaining past human behavior will require the application of evolutionary theory. As with anything in archaeology, theory is useless without clear ties t...2015-01-01
16 Codding, BrianShellfishing and the colonization of sahul: a multivariate model evaluating the dynamic effects of prey utility, transport considerations and life-history on foraging patterns and midden compositionArchaeological evidence of shellfish exploitation along the coast of Sahul (Pleistocene Australia-New Guinea) points to an apparent paradox. While the continental record as a whole suggests that human populations were very low from initial colonization through early Holocene, coastal and peri-c...2014-01-01
17 Broughton, JohnFish remains dominate Barn Owl pellets in northwestern NevadaThe foraging ecology of the Barn Owl (Tytoalba) has been studied extensively, both in the New World (Marti 1988, Castro and Jaksic 1995, Van Vuren and Moore 1998, and others) and the Old World (Glue 1967, Yom-Tov and Wool 1997, and others). Small rodents, insectivores, and small birds are generally ...Barn Owl pellets; Northwestern Nevada; Fish; Fish remains2006
18 Rogers, Alan R.Genetic evidence for a Pleistocene population explosionExpansions of population size leave characteristic signatures in mitochondrial "mismatch distributions." Consequently, these distributions can inform us about the history of changes in population size. Here, I study a simple model of population history that assumes that, t generations before the pr...1995
19 McElreath, RichardAre peasants risk-averse decision makers?For decades, researchers studying small-scale, subsistence-oriented farmers have sought to explain why these "peasants" seem slow to acquire new technologies, novel agricultural practices, and new ideas from the larger societies that have engulfed them. The early work on this question suggested that...Subsistance farmers; Risk-aversion; Risk-taking; Cultural conservatism; Cost-benefit analysis2002
20 O'Rourke, Dennis H.Biochemical heterozygosity and morphologic variation in a colony of papio hamadryas hamadryas baboonsThis analysis examines the association between genetic heterozygosity and individual morphologic variation in a captive population of Papio hamadryas hamadryas consisting of 403 juveniles and adults. The population structure of the colony was artificially generated and maintained and is thus rigoro...Population genetics; Polygenic; Inbreeding1994
21 O'Rourke, Dennis H.Hrdlič̌ka's Aleutian population-replacement hypothesis: a radiometric evaluationIn a 1945 monograph, Hrdlička argued that, at 1,000 BP, Paleo-Aleut people on Umnak Island were replaced by Neo-Aleut groups moving west along the island chain. His argument was based on cranial measurements of skeletal remains from Chaluka Midden and mummified remains from Kagamil and Ship Rock b...Population replacement; Paleo-Aleuts; Neo-Aleuts2006
22 Wiessner, Pauline W.On emergency decisions, egalitarianism, and group selectionBoehm (CA 37:763-93) puts forward an important thesis-that with the evolution of egalitarian societies, privileged routes to reproductive advantage are blocked and the power of individua selection severely compromised. With competition so constrained, altruistic behavior can more readily spread i...Boehm's mode; Evolution of altruistic behavior1998-06
23 Broughton, JohnPristine benchmarks and indigenous conservation? Implications from California zooarchaeologyThe superabundance of tame wildlife during the early historic period in California astonished European explorers. And the historic accounts of incredible animal densities, most notably artiodactyls, have influenced a long-held perception that California Indians lived in harmony with nature. However,...2004-01-01
24 Codding, BrianAlternative aboriginal economies: Martu livelihoods in the 21st centuryIn the western deserts of Australia, hunting and gathering endures as an important social and economic activity. That foraging persists within the boundaries of developed industrialized nation states may come as a surprise to those who evaluate foraging as less profitable than agricultural, wage or ...Aboriginal economics; Aboriginal foraging2015
25 Codding, BrianConservation or co-evolution? Intermediate levels of aboriginal burning and hunting have positive effects on kangaroo populations in Western AustraliaStudies of conservation in small scale societies typically portray indigenous peoples as either sustainably managing resources, or forsaking long-term sustainability for short-term gains. To explain this variability, we propose an alternative framework derived from a co-evolutionary perspective. In ...2014-01-01
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