Land and Resource Management Issues Relevant to Deploying In-Situ Thermal Technologies

School or College College of Law
Creator Keiter, Robert; Ruple, John; Tanana, Heather; Kline, Michelle
Title Land and Resource Management Issues Relevant to Deploying In-Situ Thermal Technologies
Date 2011-01
Description Abstract: Utah is home to oil shale resources containing roughly 1.3 trillion barrels of oil equivalent and our nations richest oil sands resources. If economically feasible and environmentally responsible means of tapping these resources can be developed, these resources could provide a safe and stable domestic energy source for decades to come. In Utah, oil shale and oil sands resources underlay a patchwork of federal, state, private, and tribal lands that are subject to different regulatory schemes and conflicting management objectives. Evaluating the development potential of Utahs oil shale and oil sands resources requires an understanding of jurisdictional issues and the challenges they present to deployment and efficient utilization of emerging technologies. The jurisdictional patchwork and divergent management requirements inhibit efficient, economic, and environmentally sustainable development. This report examines these barriers to resource development, methods of obtaining access to landlocked resources, and options for consolidating resource ownership. This report also examines recent legislative efforts to wrest control of western public lands from the federal government. If successful, these efforts could dramatically reshape resource control and access, though these efforts appear to fall far short of their stated goals. The unintended consequences of adversarial approaches to obtaining resource access may outweigh their benefits, hardening positions and increasing tensions to the detriment of overall coordination between resource managers. Federal land exchanges represent a more efficient and mutually beneficial means of consolidating management control and improving management efficiency. Independent of exchange proposals, resource managers must improve coordination, moving beyond mere consultation with neighboring landowners and sister agencies to coordinating actions with them.
Type Text
Publisher University of Utah
Subject LCSH In situ treatment of wastes ; Land and Resources Management
Language eng
Relation is Version of Faculty Publications; Institutional Repository
Rights Management S.J. Quinney College of Law, University of Utah
Spatial Coverage Utah
Format Medium application/pdf
ARK ark:/87278/s6p58x87
Setname ir_uspace
Date Created 2013-11-15
Date Modified 2013-11-15
ID 709964
Reference URL https://collections.lib.utah.edu/details?id=709964
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