Why hunter-gatherers work: An ancient version of the problem of public goods

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Publication Type Journal Article
School or College College of Social & Behavioral Science
Department Anthropology
Creator Hawkes, Kristen
Title Why hunter-gatherers work: An ancient version of the problem of public goods
Date 2001-08
Description From the abstract: People who hunt and gather for a living share some resources more widely than others. A favored hypothesis to explain the differential sharing is that giving up portions of large, unpredictable resources obligates others to return shares of them later, reducing everyone's variance in consumption. I show that this insurance argument is not empirically supported for !Kung, Ache, and Hadza foragers. An alternative hypothesis is that the cost of _not_ sharing these resources is too high to pay.
Type Text
Publisher University of Chicago Press
Volume 34
Issue 4
Subject Hunter-gatherer societies; Public goods
Subject LCSH Hunting and gathering societies; Economic anthropology
Language eng
Bibliographic Citation Hawkes, K. (1993). Why Hunter-gatherers work. Current Anthropology, 34(4), 341.
Rights Management (c)1993 by University of Chicago Press http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/loi/ca
Format Medium application/pdf
Identifier ir-main,111
ARK ark:/87278/s6s479pc
Setname ir_uspace
Date Created 2012-06-13
Date Modified 2012-06-13
ID 707303
Reference URL https://collections.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s6s479pc