Emergent aneurysm clipping without angiography in the moribund patient with intracerebral hemorrhage: the use of infusion computed tomography scans

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Publication Type Journal Article
School or College School of Medicine
Department Neurosurgery
Creator Dailey, Andrew T.
Other Author Le Roux, Peter D.; Newell, David W.; Grady, M. Sean; Winn, H. Richard
Title Emergent aneurysm clipping without angiography in the moribund patient with intracerebral hemorrhage: the use of infusion computed tomography scans
Date 1993
Description THE AUTHORS REPORT their experience with 25 patients (mean age, 44.3 ± 12.1 years) with an intracerebral hematoma (ICH) from a ruptured aneurysm who were emergently operated on without angiography. Instead, preoperative high-resolution infusion computed tomography (CT) scans were used to identify the aneurysm causing the hemorrhage. In all patients, the preoperative Glasgow Coma Scale score was < 5 and brain stem compression was evident. ICH was present in the frontal or temporal lobe and was often associated with intraventricular hemorrhage (n=17) and significant (>1 cm) midline shift (n = 18). Infusion CT scans correctly identified the aneurysm in all patients (middle cerebral artery, 18; posterior communicating artery, 2; carotid bifurcation, 3; anterior communicating artery, 2). Partial evacuation of the hematoma guided by infusion CT scan was usually required first to clip the aneurysm definitively using standard microvascular techniques. Intraoperative rupture occurred twice, and temporary clips were used on four occasions. Lobectomy (n = 8) , decompressive craniotomy (n=15), and ventriculostomy (n=8) were required to control cerebral swelling. All patients underwent postoperative angiography to confirm aneurysm obliteration. Eleven unruptured aneurysms were subsequently identified. Nine had been predicted by infusion scan. Twelve patients survived, eight of whom were only moderately disabled and were independent at 6-months' follow-up. Of the 13 patients who died, all except one died within 4 days of admission. The authors conclude that although angiographic verification before aneurysm surgery is preferable, in the moribund patient with intracerebral hemorrhage, infusion CT scanning provides sufficient information concerning vascular anatomy to allow rational emergency craniotomy and aneurysm clipping.
Type Text
Publisher Wolters Kluwer (LWW)
Volume 33
Issue 2
First Page 189
Last Page 197
Subject Ruptured aneurysms; Computed tomography; Infusion computed tomography; Aneurysm clipping
Subject LCSH Aneurysms; Intracranial aneurysms; Intracranial aneurysms -- Rupture; Intracranial aneurysms -- Surgery; Tomography; Outcome assessment (Medical care); Intracerebral hematoma
Language eng
Bibliographic Citation Le Roux, P. D., Dailey, A. T., Newell, D. W., Grady, M. S., & Winn, H. R. (1993). Emergent aneurysm clipping without angiography in the moribund patient with intracerebral hemorrhage: the use of infusion computed tomography scans. Neurosurgery, 33(2), 189-97.
Rights Management (c) Wolters Kluwer (LWW) http://lww.com
Format Medium application/pdf
Format Extent 1,026,497 bytes
Identifier ir-main,13110
ARK ark:/87278/s62n5kvt
Setname ir_uspace
Date Created 2012-06-13
Date Modified 2012-06-13
ID 706319
Reference URL https://collections.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s62n5kvt
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