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An Essay on the Neverlasting Hills

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Title Saga of the Sanpitch Vol 15
Subject Pioneers
Description Stories and poems about early Southern Utah Pioneers
Publisher Snow College
Date 1983
Type Text
Format image/jpeg
Language eng
Rights Management Snow College
Holding Institution Snow College
ARK ark:/87278/s6bp00z2
Setname snowc_sts
Date Created 2005-03-01
Date Modified 2005-03-01
ID 323075
Reference URL https://collections.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s6bp00z2

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Title An Essay on the Neverlasting Hills
Description AN ESSAY ON THE NEVERLASTING HILLS Albert Antrei One doesn't need to live in Utah very long before he hears speeches and songs about "the everlasting hills." He hears it so often that even after a stiff course or two in geology he unconsciously begins to believe that them thar hills really are everlasting. The snows and rains of 1982-83, however, have recently given him pause to think about it. The mountains and plateaus that surround the Sanpete and Gunnison Valleys are not inunune to change. It was a bad omen for the spring and summer still in the future when snow covered the roses in September in the Sanpete Valley in 1982. The fluffy stuff drove sheep herds off summer range from one to several weeks earlier than their schedule called for. There have been occasions of early snow in Sanpete in other years, but this time it kept on snowing and meant business. In fact, getting sheep off the mountain in September 1982 could be called "Operation Rescue," which is what reporter Bruce Jennings called it in the Messenger of October 6, 1982. Snow piled up so deeply in critical places that it required not only all the effort Sanpete County officials could put into it, but it also took help from the State of Utah and some federal agencies as well to rescue whole herds of sheep and their herders, elk hunters, and anybody else caught in the mountains on business or pleasure. The means of getting help to men and beasts was by National Guard and privately owned heavy equipment and helicopters. Governor Scott Matheson flew over the Manti Mountain on October 3 to see for himself. Wrote Bruce Jennings: Rescue operations involved opening canyon roads to Skyline Drive and clearing routes to herds trapped in places like Lake Fork, George's Fork and the Cove. Heavy work was done by bull-dozers provided by the Utah National Guard, -40-
Format image/jpeg
Identifier 054_An Essay on the Neverlasting Hills.jpg
Source Saga of the Sanpitch Vol 15
Setname snowc_sts
Date Created 2005-02-18
Date Modified 2005-02-18
ID 323008
Reference URL https://collections.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s6bp00z2/323008