GRL_BAKER_PAGE20

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Title Pearl Baker: Interviewed by John McFarlane
Subject Authors; Teachers; Librarians; Cowgirls; Ranchers
Spatial Coverage Green River (Utah); Emery County (Utah); San Rafael Desert (Utah)
Personal Names Baker, Pearl Biddlecomb (1907-1992)
Description Oral history interview of Pearl Baker, recounting reminicences of Southeastern Utah.
Creator Baker, Pearl Biddlecomb (1907-1992)
Publisher Utah State Historical Society and California State University, Fullerton
Contributors McFarlane, John
Date Digital 2004-07-09
Date 1971-07-09
Type Text
Format application/pdf
Format Creation Scanned at 400ppi on an Epson Expression 1630XL flatbed scanner. Files saved as uncompressed TIFF and re-sized to JPEG using PhotoShop CS.
Source Original booklet: Pearl Baker: Interviewed by John McFarlane.
Language eng
Relation Southeastern Utah Oral History Project, sponsored by Utah State Historical Society and California State University, Fullerton Oral History Program. O.H. 726
Rights Management Digital image copyright 2004, Green River Public Library. All rights reserved.
Holding Institution Green River Public Library, 85 South Long St., Green River, UT 84525
Source Physical Dimensions 8.5" x 11"
Scanning Technician Nima Rakhsha
Metadata Cataloger Denice Hoffman, Kenning Arlitsch
ARK ark:/87278/s62j6bqg
Setname gr_pbb
Date Created 2004-07-09
Date Modified 2004-07-09
ID 317725
Reference URL https://collections.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s62j6bqg

Page Metadata

Title GRL_BAKER_PAGE20
Description BAKER 20 At that time Cainesville was quite a settlement and now, Mrs. Robinson tells me, "Why up in that draw there was a beautiful home, a two-story house with big trees around it." There is nothing there now, it is completely, completely gonel But at that time in the 1880s and 1890s, Cainesville was a booming place. Then Hanksville was just a little offshoot of that. The Henry Mountains in the early days of the Bromide was a mining area. It boomed at one time and had considerable activity. Of course, that drained through Hanksville. Down on the Green River it was Bucyrus. I didn't know that until just the other day. It was a Bucyrus dredge from Minnesota. They still put out dredging machinery. It was hauled from Green River over there. Mrs. Robinson's father, Charley Gibbons, had the contract of hauling it down where it was covered by the waters of the lake. M: When did you start to write? B: Oh, I've always written. This winter my mother said, "I'm surprised you wrote a book." And I said, "No, Mama, you're not either surprised I wrote a book. You're surprised I sold the book and so am I!" I've always written. I used to correspond for the newspaper here and I did that in kind of a funny way. George Franz bought a little bunch of cows out here with the Chaffins and according to the paper, because his neighbors were the correspondents, George Franz was the coming cattleman of the country. And I said, "That Johnny-Come-Lately, how come?" The neighbors got so they didn't want to correspond anymore and I said, "Well, it's just time we got a little bit of this cowboy notoriety." So I wrote down to Bish Taylor and asked if I could write for the paper. They were delighted to have me and I want you to know that George Franz suffered a terrible eclipse. (laughter) I shot him out of the saddle but good. So I corresponded for the paper for a long time. I've always wanted to write. I guess, if you want to write, nothing else does it-just nothing else does it. Right now people will say, "Are you working on another book?" Well, when am I not working on another book? I don't get them all printed but then who does. It's like any other craft, you learn it as you go along; you learn as you do it. The things that I read that I have written several years ago almost break my heart because they lack polish. However, we have a little thing about that, too. Dock Marston wrote to Barbara and said, "If Pearl would just polish her materials, she would go far." I said, "Well, that old son of a b. Just because my stuff reads like it came off the end of my pencil is not necessarily true. That's why I sit up nights; that's why all this
Format application/pdf
Identifier 023_GRL_BAKER_PAGE20.JPG
Source Original booklet: Pearl Baker: Interviewed by John McFarlane
Setname gr_pbb
Date Created 2005-03-18
Date Modified 2005-03-18
ID 317716
Reference URL https://collections.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s62j6bqg/317716