Improving the Quality of Provider Education on High Screen Time Use Given to Parents of Infant's & Young Children within a Primary Care Clinical Setting

Update item information
Identifier 2018_Owens
Title Improving the Quality of Provider Education on High Screen Time Use Given to Parents of Infant's & Young Children within a Primary Care Clinical Setting
Creator Owens, Shalise H.
Subject Advanced Practice Nursing; Education, Nursing, Graduate; Systems Analysis; Needs Assessment; Infant; Child; Primary Health Care; Social Media; Mobile Applications; Video Games; Television; Parent-Child Relations; Motivational Interviewing; Self Efficacy; Socialization; Social Communication Disorder; Screen Time Limitation
Description INTRODUCTION: Research has shown that too much screen time can be harmful to young children. Primary care and pediatric providers see children a total of 21 times for Well Child Checks (WCC) before their fifth birthday, allowing for plenty of time for providers to discuss the importance of screen time limitation with parents or guardians of pediatric patients. PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to determine whether or not there was a need to increase and improve education on screen time limitation within the primary care setting of a well-established clinic located within a small urban city just north of Salt Lake City, Utah. METHODS: A community needs assessment was completed by 436 participants, all of whom were parents of at least one child between the ages of 0-5 years old. A total of 20 parents of children between the ages of 0-5 years old completed a screening survey, pre- and post- education knowledge assessments on screen time and were given an educational handout that was created for this project. Pre- and post-knowledge scores were analyzed using the paired signed rank Wilcoxon test. Following the educational portion of the encounter, each participant completed a survey that analyzed participants' overall satisfaction with the content of the educational handout and how they would best like to receive the information on screen time in the future. RESULTS: Over 51% of the 436 participants who completed the community needs assessment stated that their primary care or pediatric provider had never talked to them about limiting their child's screen time. This data correlates well with the frequency in which the providers at the clinic reported how often they discussed screen time during WCCs, which was right around 50% of the time. There was a statistically significant difference (p < 0.0001) in the participants' overall knowledge on screen time after the project administrator provided education on the topic. Overall, 100% of the participants were satisfied with the educational handout and information provided and requested that this information be included at every WCC. CONCLUSIONS: The majority of the pediatric population is at risk for high screen time use. Screen time limitation is an important piece of education that needs to be provided at every WCC by primary or pediatric care providers. Parents want to be told by their children's providers about how much screen time their children should be getting daily. More longitudinal studies on screen time are necessary to truly understand how screen time is effecting children from birth to young adulthood.
Relation is Part of Graduate Nursing Project, Doctor of Nursing Practice
Publisher Spencer S. Eccles Health Sciences Library, University of Utah
Date 2018
Type Text
Rights Management © 2018 College of Nursing, University of Utah
Holding Institution Spencer S. Eccles Health Sciences Library, University of Utah
Collection Nursing Practice Project
Language eng
ARK ark:/87278/s6w99gzf
Metadata Cataloger AMT
Setname ehsl_gradnu
Date Created 2018-08-31
Date Modified 2021-05-06
ID 1367254
Reference URL https://collections.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s6w99gzf
Back to Search Results