You've searched: Type: "Image/MovingImage" Collection: ehsl_novel_jmec
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TitleDescriptionType
51 Light-Near DissociationExample of patient with Argyll Robertson pupil with neurosyphilis. Shows a lack of pupillary response to light and some pupillary response to nearness of finger.Image/MovingImage
52 Marcus Jaw WinkingExample of patient with Marcus Jaw Winking. Patient is led through instructions for movement of jaw (open, close, back and forth), with eyelid seen to be affected. Patient is then led through instructions for direction of gaze and pursuit.Image/MovingImage
53 Measuring Visual AcuityDemonstration on self of visual acuity exam, using a standard card.Image/MovingImage
54 Monocular Pendular NystagmusExample of a patient with monocular pendular nystagmus, with discussion of situations in which this condition is seen: acquired disorder of the visual-sensory pathway, and acquired disorder of the brain stem (e.g. multiple sclerosis).Image/MovingImage
55 Normal Light Reflex without RAPDThis clip demonstrates the examination of the Relative Afferent Pupillary Defect (RAPD.) Demonstration of gauging the size of the pupil in light, testing light reflexes, swinging flashlight test for optic nerve abnormality.Image/MovingImage
56 Ocular FlutterTwo examples of patients, the first with rotary, flutter-like movements, but not ocular flutter, and the second with genuine ocular flutter. Discussion of difference between ocular flutter and nystagmus, and how to elicit ocular flutter.Image/MovingImage
57 Ocular Lateropulsion (Wallenberg's Syndrome)Example of patient with ocular lateropulsion. Patient also has central Horner syndrome and nystagmus in right gaze. When shifting gaze back to forward, eyes overshoot their mark. Eyes laterally deviate to the right upon opening.Image/MovingImage
58 Ocular MyastheniaExample of patient with myasthenia gravis. Demonstration of tensilon test. Patient shown to have bilateral ptosis, bilateral duction deficits, and left hypertropia. Discussion of techniques to observe subtle changes, such as bringing in a neutral observer or taking still photographs. Shows split-scr...Image/MovingImage
59 Ocular MyotoniaExample of patient with ocular myotonia. Patient is led through instructions for direction of gaze and opening and closing of eyes. Right eye is shown to be stuck in position after held gaze to the left and right, with very slow relaxation back into forward gaze.Image/MovingImage
60 Oculopalatal MyoclonusOculopalatal myoclonus (OPM) Rhythmic oscillations of eyes and palate. Occurred after specific brainstem injury from stroke, following stenting. Related PowerPoint Presentation: http://content.lib.utah.edu/u?/EHSL-Moran-Neuro-opth,129Image/MovingImage
61 Oculopalatal Myoclonus (PPT)Oculopalatal myoclonus (OPM) Rhythmic oscillations of eyes and palate. Occurred after specific brainstem injury from stroke, following stenting. Related Video: http://content.lib.utah.edu/u?/EHSL-Moran-Neuro-opth,128Image/MovingImage
62 OpsoclonusExample of patients with opsoclonus, a saccadic abnormality. Discussion of characteristics of opsoclonus, such as involuntary, rapid, brief, random, conjugate saccades. Discussion of possible causes, including brain stem encephalitis (as in first patient), a paraneoplastic effect, tumors, and drug t...Image/MovingImage
63 OpsoclonusExample of patients with opsoclonus, a saccadic abnormality.Image/MovingImage
64 Paradoxical Constriction of Pupils to Darkness (Flynn Phenomenon)Example of patients both with and without paradoxical constriction of pupils. Observed in many congenital retinal disorders, such as achromatopsia, congenital stationary night-blindness, and Leber's congenital amaurosis. Sometimes seen in optic nerve disorders, such as dominant optic atrophy.Image/MovingImage
65 Parinaud's SyndromeTwo examples of patients with Parinaud's syndrome, a dorsal midbrain syndrome. Discussion of hallmarks of this syndrome, including convergence retraction nystagmus, vertical gaze palsies, light-near dissociation, and Collier's Sign. Discussion of age-dependent disorders associated with this syndrome...Image/MovingImage
66 Periodic Alternating NystagmusExample of a patient with periodic alternating nystagmus, showing an alternation between left-beats and right-beats as the patient maintains forward gaze. Nystagmus maintain horizontal direction regardless of position of gaze.Image/MovingImage
67 Physiologic (End-Gaze) NystagmusDemonstration of physiological nystagmus, where oscillations do not represent pathology, but occur when the patient's gaze is drawn too far laterally.Image/MovingImage
68 Progressive Supranuclear PalsyExample of patient with progressive supranuclear palsy. Discussion of difference between saccadic movement in supranuclear palsy and nystagmus. Shows saccadic intrusions in forward gaze, pursuit, saccades, and doll's head maneuver.Image/MovingImage
69 Progressive Supranuclear PalsyProgressive Supranuclear PalsyImage/MovingImage
70 Pulsating ExophthalmosExample of a patient with neurofibromatosis with an absent sphenoid wing. Shows left eye pulsating back and forth with the pulse from front and side views.Image/MovingImage
71 RAPD PresentThis clip demonstrates the technique used to determine that Relative Afferent Pupillary Defect (RAPD) is present in a patient.Image/MovingImage
72 Rebound NystagmusExample of a patient with rebound nystagmus, where the oscillations alternate direction as the patient shifts gaze in different directions. Discussion of relationship to disease and disorders of the cerebellum, including degenerations of the cerebellum, infarction, and demyelination.Image/MovingImage
73 Retraction NystagmusPatient with retraction nystagmus (no audio)Image/MovingImage
74 Rotary DownbeatPatient with rotary downbeat nystagmus (no audio)Image/MovingImage
75 Rotary NystagmusExample of a patient with rotary nystagmus, showing occasional counterclockwise rotary movements of both eyes. Seen more in intrinsic disorders of the brainstem.Image/MovingImage
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