Drill baby drill: an analysis of how energy development displaced ranching's dominance over the BLM'S subgovernment policymaking environment

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Publication Type dissertation
School or College College of Social & Behavioral Science
Department Political Science
Author Forbis, Robert Earl Jr.
Title Drill baby drill: an analysis of how energy development displaced ranching's dominance over the BLM'S subgovernment policymaking environment
Date 2010
Description Academic literature analyzing the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) land-use subgovernment stops at the Taylor Grazing Act and concludes that the historical development of administering grazing on public lands led to the capture of the BLM by ranching interests. Using a two-pronged methodological approach of process tracing and elite interviews this dissertation seeks to advance our collective knowledge of subgovernment theory by a) clarifying the impact executive decision-making has on subgovernments and b) identifying the conditions under which strategically competitive behavior between two competing subgovernment actors occurs. The dissertation seeks to update the literature by explaining what has caused the BLM to shift from a rancherdominated agency to an energy dominated agency by identifying conditions under which subgovernment actors strategically respond to a political conflict.
Type Text
Publisher University of Utah
Subject Conflict; Energy; Energy Development; Dominance; Land; Balance of Power; Historical Development; Policy Making; Legislative Bodies
Dissertation Institution University of Utah
Dissertation Name Pharm.D
Language eng
Rights Management ©Robert Earl Forbis Jr.
Format Medium application/pdf
Format Extent 1,108,793 bytes
Source original in Marriott Library Special Collections ; HD30.5 2010 .F67
ARK ark:/87278/s6jh41pj
Setname ir_etd
Date Created 2012-04-23
Date Modified 2021-05-06
ID 192931
Reference URL https://collections.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s6jh41pj
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