Ash Deposition Modeling Incorporating Mineral Matter Transformations Applied to Coal and Biomass Co-firing

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Title Ash Deposition Modeling Incorporating Mineral Matter Transformations Applied to Coal and Biomass Co-firing
Creator Adams, Bradley
Contributor David, Kevin; Wang Huafeng; Valentine, James; Smith, Brian; Shi, Liming; and Pozzobon, Ed
Date 2013-09-25
Spatial Coverage Kauai, Hawaii
Subject AFRC 2013 Industrial Combustion Symposium
Description Paper from the AFRC 2013 conference titled Ash Deposition Modeling Incorporating Mineral Matter Transformations Applied to Coal and Biomass Co-firing by Bradley Adams
Abstract behavior when firing biomass in coal-fired boilers. The Nalco Mobotec System can enable boilers to switch to biomass co-firing or burn up to 100 percent biomass with no change in boiler load capacity, while meeting strict emission control requirements. As biomass often contains inorganic compounds that can impact deposition/slagging/fouling/corrosion, care has been taken to consider potential ash impacts, offering chemical treatments that have successfully reduced deposition rates and reduced the tenacity of the deposits that do form. In an effort to mitigate risk and to provide guidance related to the magnitude, location, and sintering extent of deposition, REI has worked with Nalco Mobotec to complement their in-house modeling efforts with its unique tools and expertise in this area. Results of CFD-based modeling efforts incorporating REI's Mineral Matter Transformation and Deposit Build-up Model quantitatively illustrated the impact of various pelletized biomass fuels on deposition behavior and fireside corrosion for a 660 MW opposed-wall coal-fired boiler. Three different woods and one combined wood and straw mixture were evaluated. Simulation results indicated that biomass co-firing relative to 100% coal-firing produced: • An increase in deposition rates and deposit sintering, resulting in some reduction in wall heat transfer, • Decreases in water wall corrosion rates, • Modest increases in furnace exit gas temperature (FEGT), • 35-40% decrease in NOx emissions, • Similar CO emissions, • Slight decreases in unburned carbon in fly ash.
Type Event
Format application/pdf
Rights No copyright issues
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ARK ark:/87278/s6j70f42
Setname uu_afrc
Date Created 2014-10-14
Date Modified 2014-10-14
ID 14386
Reference URL https://collections.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s6j70f42