Epidemiology of Voice and Swallowing Disorders in Sjogren's Syndrome

Update item information
Publication Type thesis
School or College College of Health
Department Communication Sciences & Disorders
Author Pierce, Jennifer
Title Epidemiology of Voice and Swallowing Disorders in Sjogren's Syndrome
Date 2014-12
Description Individuals with Sjögren's Syndrome (SS) have autoimmune symptoms causing systemic dryness. The disease purportedly affects voice and swallowing function. However, little is known regarding the true prevalence of voice and swallowing problems and symptoms in SS and their effects on quality of life. This preliminary epidemiological investigation aimed to (1) assess the prevalence of voice and swallowing problems in SS, (2) identify risk factors for voice and swallowing problems in SS, and (3) better understand the functional, social, occupational, and emotional effects of voice and swallowing problems in SS. One hundred and one individuals with SS (7 males, 94 females; mean age 59.4, <italic>SD</italic> = 14.1) were interviewed using an extensive questionnaire. Questions surrounding the individual's medical, psychosocial, occupational, and social/lifestyle history, as well as voice and swallowing symptoms, SS severity, and health-related quality of life, were explored. The results were analyzed using summary statistics, chi-square tests, risk ratios, and confidence intervals (<italice>p</italic> < .05). Of the 101 individuals with SS, 59.4% reported a current voice disorder and 64.4% reported a current swallowing disorder. These disorders began gradually, were chronic, and correlated with SS disease severity. These results indicated that voice and swallowing problems are relatively common in SS and are more frequent as disease severity worsens. Voice symptoms, including frequent throat-clearing, chronic throat soreness, difficulty projecting the voice, and discomfort with voice use, were significantly correlated with health-related quality of life; chronic throat dryness, a monotone voice, a wobbly or shaky voice, and chronic throat soreness were significantly associated with SS disease severity. Swallowing symptoms, including difficulty swallowing medications, sneezing with eating, wheezing after eating, food sticking in the throat, increased mucous in throat, and taking smaller bites for safety were correlated with health-related quality of life; taking smaller bites, mucous in throat, difficulty placing food in the mouth, and wheezing while eating were significantly associated with SS disease severity. However, only 15.8% with voice disorders and 42% with swallowing disorders sought treatment for these symptoms. These findings have implications for evaluation and treatment paradigms in individuals with SS.
Type Text
Publisher University of Utah
Subject Speech therapy
Subject MESH Prevalence; Sjogren's Syndrome; Autoimmune Diseases; Deglutition Disorders; Voice Disorders; Quality of Life; Cross-Sectional Studies
Dissertation Institution University of Utah
Dissertation Name Master of Science
Language eng
Relation is Version of Digital version of Epidemiology of Voice and Swallowing Disorders in Sjogren's Syndrome
Rights Management (c) Jennifer Pierce
Format Medium application/pdf
Source Original in Marriott Library Special Collections
ARK ark:/87278/s65f2wwq
Setname ir_etd
Date Created 2018-06-19
Date Modified 2021-05-06
ID 1344064
Reference URL https://collections.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s65f2wwq
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