201 - 225 of 2,376
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TitleCreatorDescription
201 CRAO with Ciliary Artery SparingKathleen B. Digre, MD, Professor of Neurology and Ophthalmology, Director of Neuro-Ophthalmology, John A. Moran Eye Center, University of Utah School of Medicine; James J. Corbett, MD, University Of MississippiSlideshow describing condition.
202 Pit tumor Chiasm compressionKathleen B. Digre, MD, Professor of Neurology and Ophthalmology, Director of Neuro-Ophthalmology, John A. Moran Eye Center, University of Utah School of Medicine; James J. Corbett, MD, University Of MississippiSlideshow describing condition.
203 Terson's SyndromeKathleen B. Digre, MD, Professor of Neurology and Ophthalmology, Director of Neuro-Ophthalmology, John A. Moran Eye Center, University of Utah School of Medicine; James J. Corbett, MD, University Of MississippiSlideshow describing condition.
204 Scleritis (posterior scleritis)Kathleen B. Digre, MD, Professor of Neurology and Ophthalmology, Director of Neuro-Ophthalmology, John A. Moran Eye Center, University of Utah School of Medicine; James J. Corbett, MD, University Of MississippiSlideshow describing condition.
205 Branch retinal emboliKathleen B. Digre, MD, Professor of Neurology and Ophthalmology, Director of Neuro-Ophthalmology, John A. Moran Eye Center, University of Utah School of Medicine; James J. Corbett, MD, University Of MississippiSlideshow describing condition.
206 Fibrous DysplasiaKathleen B. Digre, MD, Professor of Neurology and Ophthalmology, Director of Neuro-Ophthalmology, John A. Moran Eye Center, University of Utah School of Medicine; James J. Corbett, MD, University Of MississippiSlideshow describing condition.
207 Craniopharyngioma and optic atrophyKathleen B. Digre, MD, Professor of Neurology and Ophthalmology, Director of Neuro-Ophthalmology, John A. Moran Eye Center, University of Utah School of Medicine; James J. Corbett, MD, University Of MississippiSlideshow describing condition.
208 Calcific EmboliKathleen B. Digre, MD, Professor of Neurology and Ophthalmology, Director of Neuro-Ophthalmology, John A. Moran Eye Center, University of Utah School of Medicine; James J. Corbett, MD, University Of MississippiSlideshow describing condition.
209 Branch Retinal Vein Occlusion (BRVO)Kathleen B. Digre, MD, Professor of Neurology and Ophthalmology, Director of Neuro-Ophthalmology, John A. Moran Eye Center, University of Utah School of Medicine; James J. Corbett, MD, University Of MississippiSlideshow describing condition.
210 CENTRAL RETINAL VEIN OCCLUSIONKathleen B. Digre, MD, Professor of Neurology and Ophthalmology, Director of Neuro-Ophthalmology, John A. Moran Eye Center, University of Utah School of Medicine; James J. Corbett, MD, University Of MississippiSlideshow describing condition.
211 Ischemic Ocular SyndromeKathleen B. Digre, MD, Professor of Neurology and Ophthalmology, Director of Neuro-Ophthalmology, John A. Moran Eye Center, University of Utah School of Medicine; James J. Corbett, MD, University Of MississippiSlideshow describing condition.
212 Viewing the Red ReflexKathleen B. Digre, MD, Professor of Neurology and Ophthalmology, Director of Neuro-Ophthalmology, John A. Moran Eye Center, University of Utah School of Medicine; James J. Corbett, MD, University Of MississippiSlideshow describing eye examination of children.
213 Fat EmboliKathleen B. Digre, MD, Professor of Neurology and Ophthalmology, Director of Neuro-Ophthalmology, John A. Moran Eye Center, University of Utah School of Medicine; James J. Corbett, MD, University Of MississippiSlideshow describing condition.
214 Vascular Supply of the EyeKathleen B. Digre, MD, Professor of Neurology and Ophthalmology, Director of Neuro-Ophthalmology, John A. Moran Eye Center, University of Utah School of Medicine; James J. Corbett, MD, University Of MississippiSlideshow describing vascular supply of the eye.
215 Occlusion of the Central Retinal ArteryKathleen B. Digre, MD, Professor of Neurology and Ophthalmology, Director of Neuro-Ophthalmology, John A. Moran Eye Center, University of Utah School of Medicine; James J. Corbett, MD, University Of MississippiSlideshow describing condition.
216 Cilioretinal Artery OcclusionKathleen B. Digre, MD, Professor of Neurology and Ophthalmology, Director of Neuro-Ophthalmology, John A. Moran Eye Center, University of Utah School of Medicine; James J. Corbett, MD, University Of MississippiSlideshow describing condition.
217 Joint Commission International Accreditation Standards for Ambulatory CareJoint Commission International Accreditation (JCIA)This second edition of the Joint Commission International Accreditation Standards for Ambulatory Care contains all the standards, intent statements, and measurable elements of standards; accreditation policies and procedures; a glossary of key terms; and an index.
218 Walsh & Hoyt: Visual HallucinationsMatthew Rizzo, M.D., F.A.A.N., Department of Neurological Sciences, University of Nebraska; Jason J S Barton, MD PhD FRCP(C), Professor, Medicine (Neurology), Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Psychology, The University of British ColumbiaHallucinations are perceptions without external stimulation of the relevant sensory organ. Individuals vary in the degree of insight they possessthat is, whether they recognize these experiences as being ""not real."" Some propose the term ""pseudohallucinations"" for experiences with preserved insi...
219 Walsh & Hoyt: Disorders of Motion Perception (Akinetopsia)Matthew Rizzo, M.D., F.A.A.N., Department of Neurological Sciences, University of Nebraska; Jason J S Barton, MD PhD FRCP(C), Professor, Medicine (Neurology), Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Psychology, The University of British ColumbiaAkinetopsia (cerebral akinetopsia) is the term used to describe complete loss of movement perception from an acquired cerebral lesion. Unlike cerebral achromatopsia, which was described in the late 1800s, akinetopsia was not reported until the 1980s, after the discovery of motion-selective extrastri...
220 Walsh & Hoyt: Electro-Oculogram (EOG)Michael Wall, MD, University of Iowa, Department of Neurology and Ophthalmology; Chris A. Johnson, MD, Devers Eye InstituteIn 1848, Dubois-Reymond reported that a difference in electric potential of about 6 microvolts was present between the cornea and the back of the eye. It was subsequently appreciated that the human eye acts as a dipole, with the cornea positive with respect to the retina. If two electrodes are place...
221 Walsh & Hoyt: Electroretinogram (ERG)Michael Wall, MD, University of Iowa, Department of Neurology and Ophthalmology; Chris A. Johnson, MD, Devers Eye InstituteThe Swedish physiologist Holmgren reported in 1865 that in vertebrates and higher invertebrates, an alteration in the electric potential occurred when light fell on the retina. Dewar (234) subsequently recorded this electric response and called it the electroretinogram. Einthoven and Jolly (235) ide...
222 Walsh & Hoyt: Perimetry and Visual Field TestingMichael Wall, MD, University of Iowa, Department of Neurology and Ophthalmology; Chris A. Johnson, MD, Devers Eye InstitutePerimetry and visual field testing have been clinical diagnostic test procedures for more than 150 years. Although instrumentation and testing strategies have changed dramatically over this time, the basic principle underlying conventional perimetry has remained the same. Detection sensitivity is de...
223 Walsh & Hoyt: Psychophysical TestsMichael Wall, MD, University of Iowa, Department of Neurology and Ophthalmology; Chris A. Johnson, MD, Devers Eye InstituteLight represents a very small portion of the electromagnetic spectrum (wavelengths between 400 and 700 nm), is emitted by natural and artificial sources, and is reflected by objects in the environment, thereby serving as the stimulus for vision. Light entering the eye is first refracted by the tear ...
224 Walsh & Hoyt: Color Vision and Brightness ComparisonMichael Wall, MD, University of Iowa, Department of Neurology and Ophthalmology; Chris A. Johnson, MD, Devers Eye InstituteColor vision testing, using pseudoisochromatic plates, the Farnsworth 100 Hue and D-15 tests, or the Lanthony 15 Desaturated D-15 panel can be helpful in detecting subtle signs of optic neuropathy or macular disease. While it has been proposed that acquired color vision loss respects color vision ax...
225 Walsh & Hoyt: Fundus ExaminationMichael Wall, MD, University of Iowa, Department of Neurology and Ophthalmology; Chris A. Johnson, MD, Devers Eye InstituteA fundus examination is essential for evaluating the macula, retina, nerve fiber layer, and optic nerve. This can be performed by several methods, including direct ophthalmoscopy and indirect ophthalmoscopy with a 20-diopter handheld lens. Examination of the macula with a 78- or 90-diopter handheld ...
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