You've searched: Collection: ehsl_novel_jmec
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TitleDescriptionType
176 3-33b - Papilledema StagesGrading Papilledema: Stage 2 = Elevation of the disc margin 360 degrees. Since the blood vessels at the disc margin are not swollen or obscured, this disc could be mistaken for pseudo-papilledema.Image
177 Tilted DiscsShort PowerPoint discussion of tilted discs with illustrations and images.Image
178 Multifocal ElectroretinogramsThe most important development in ERGs is the multifocal ERG (mfERG). Erich Sutter adapted the mathematical sequences called binary m-sequences creating a program that can extract hundreds of focal ERGs from a single electrical signal. This system allows assessment of ERG activity in small areas of ...
179 Spiral and Stellate Visual Fields Non-physiologic VariantsDescription of testing the spiral and stellate visual fields.
180 Visually Evoked PotentialsDetailed explanation of visually evoked potentials. The terms visually evoked potential (VEP), visually evoked response (VER) and visually evoked cortical potential (VECP) are equivalent. They refer to electrical potentials, initiated by brief visual stimuli, which are recorded from the scalp overl...Text
181 The Electro-oculogram: Clinical ApplicationsThe electrooculogram measures the potential that exists between the cornea and Bruch's membrane at the back of the eye. The potential produces a dipole field with the cornea approximately 5 millivolts positive compared to the back of the eye, in a normally illuminated room. Although the origin of th...Text
182 The Electroretinogram and Electro-oculogram: Clinical ApplicationsThe global or full-field electroretinogram (ERG) is a mass electrical response of the retina to photic stimulation. The ERG is a test used worldwide to assess the status of the retina in eye diseases in human patients and in laboratory animals used as models of retinal disease.Text
183 The Multifocal Electroretinogram: Clinical ApplicationsThe most important development in ERGs is the multifocal ERG (mfERG). Erich Sutter adapted the mathematical sequences called binary m-sequences creating a program that can extract hundreds of focal ERGs from a single electrical signal. This system allows assessment of ERG activity in small areas of ...Text
184 Why Don't You See Double?This presentation was given at the Neurology Grand Rounds in Fall 2011 at the University of Utah. A number of Duane Syndrome cases are covered. Related video can be found in this collection at: Duane's Syndrome Type I: http://content.lib.utah.edu/u?/EHSL-Moran-Neuro-opth,130 Duane's Syndrome Type I...Text
185 Duane's Syndrome Type IIIClip of patient with Duane's Syndrome Type III. Presented at the Neurology Grand Rounds in Fall 2011 at the University of Utah. Presentation can be found in this collection at: Why Don't You See Double? http://content.lib.utah.edu/u?/EHSL-Moran-Neuro-opth,132Image/MovingImage
186 Duane's Syndrome Type IClip of patient with Duane's Syndrome Type I. Presented at the Neurology Grand Rounds in Fall 2011 at the University of Utah. Presentation can be found in this collection at: Why Don't You See Double? http://content.lib.utah.edu/u?/EHSL-Moran-Neuro-opth,132Image/MovingImage
187 Oculopalatal MyoclonusOculopalatal myoclonus (OPM) Rhythmic oscillations of eyes and palate. Occurred after specific brainstem injury from stroke, following stenting. Related PowerPoint Presentation: http://content.lib.utah.edu/u?/EHSL-Moran-Neuro-opth,129Image/MovingImage
188 Oculopalatal Myoclonus (PPT)Oculopalatal myoclonus (OPM) Rhythmic oscillations of eyes and palate. Occurred after specific brainstem injury from stroke, following stenting. Related Video: http://content.lib.utah.edu/u?/EHSL-Moran-Neuro-opth,128Image/MovingImage
189 Left-sided Horner's syndrome with an acquired preganglionic localizationLeft-sided Horner's syndrome in a 12-year-old girl with an acquired preganglionic localization based on clinical and pharmacologic testing. The cause remained undetermined after extensive radiologic investigations. Left-sided ptosis and miosis are evident in room light (top), and the degree of aniso...Image/StillImage
190 Structures of the irisStructures of the iris. The a indicates the anterior border layer that terminates at the pigmentary ruff of the pupillary border (b). The c indicates the iris sphincter muscle, which is oriented circumferentially within the stroma and located deep to the anterior border layer; d indicates vessels th...Image/StillImage
191 Anatomy of the pupillary light reflex pathwayAnatomy of the pupillary light reflex pathway. (Miller NR: Walsh And Hoyt's Clinical Neuro-Ophthalmology, p 421. Vol 2, 4th ed. Baltimore: Williams & Wilkins, 1985, with permission.)Image/StillImage
192 Location of pupillomotor fibersLocation of pupillomotor fibers are depicted as dark regions on cross-sections of the right (R) and left (L) oculomotor nerve at various locations along its course, including its emergence from the brain stem in the interpeduncular fossa (1), the midsubarachnoid segment (2), the level of the dorsum ...Image/StillImage
193 Anatomy of the oculosympathetic pathwayAnatomy of the oculosympathetic pathway. (Maloney WF, Younge BR, Moyer NJ: Evaluation of the causes and accuracy of pharmacologic localization in Horner's syndrome. Am J Ophthalmol 1980;90:394-402, Ophthalmic Publishing Company with permission.)Image/StillImage
194 The course of the postganglionic segment of the oculosympathetic fibers from the internal carotid arteryThe course of the postganglionic segment of the oculosympathetic fibers from the internal carotid artery (ICA) to the orbit is depicted as a dotted line. Note that they briefly join the abducens nerve (cranial nerve VI) before joining the nasociliary branch of the of the ophthalmic division of the t...Image/StillImage
195 The normal pupillary light reflexThe normal pupillary light reflex is initiated following exposure to light. After a brief latency, both the right (solid line) and left (broken line) pupil constrict, then undergo a small amount of redilation (escape), followed by oscillations (hippus) if the light is sustained. Hippus is not a path...Image/StillImage
196 Relationship between age and pupil sizeRelationship between age and pupil size, determined using an infrared flash photograph technique with subjects placed in darkness for 3 minutes. The numbers above the abscissa indicate the number of subjects tested in each age range. (Reprinted with permission of Loewenfeld IE: "Simple, central" ani...Image/StillImage
197 Pupillogram of a healthy young subjectPupillogram of a healthy young subject showing continuous pupillary oscillations of both pupils when light is sustained, indicated by the dark arrow at the top of the recording. Note that the oscillations of the pupils are synchronous and demonstrate variable amplitude and frequency. This pattern of...Image/StillImage
198 Right-sided relative afferent pupillary defectRight-sided relative afferent pupillary defect in a man with optic nerve glioma. When the unaffected left eye is stimulated by light, both pupils constrict (top). When the light is then swung over to the affected right eye, both pupils dilate (bottom). This indicates that pupillomotor conduction thr...Image/StillImage
199 Assessment of an afferent pupillary defect when only one iris is functionalAssessment of an afferent pupillary defect when only one iris is functional. In this example, a right-sided parasellar tumor is compressing both the optic and oculomotor nerves, causing an optic neuropathy and a pupil-involving third crainial nerve palsy. The pupil on the affected side has both an a...Image/StillImage
200 An enhancing bladder metastasis involving the tectum of the midbrainMagnetic resonance image of an enhancing bladder metastasis involving the tectum of the midbrain of a 56-year-old man who developed double vision resulting from skew deviation and divergence insufficiency. He also had a left-sided relative afferent pupillary defect measuring 1.4 log units but showed...Image/StillImage
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