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TitleCreatorDescription
126 Oculopharyngeal Muscular Dystrophy (OPMD)Natasha Nayak, MD; Rudrani Banik, MD; New York Eye & Ear Infirmary of Mount Sinai, NY, NYPower point of case presentation of chronic, progressive ophthalmoplegia and bilateral ptosis in adult male with positive family history of similar ocular findings. Differential diagnosis with associated findings reviewed. Work up done: EMG testing consistent with myopathy. Genetic testing positiv...
127 Prolactinoma in PregnancyTimothy Sullivan, MD; Rudrani Banik, MD; New York Eye & Ear Infirmary of Mount Sinai, NY, NY 10003Power point of case of prolactinoma which became symptomatic during pregnancy with visual field loss. Discussion of prolactinomas and their management. Patient underwent observation only. Post-partum examination revealed resolution of bitemporal field defect with reduction in size of prolactinoma ...
128 Palinopsia: Some Visions Never FadeAmrita-Amanda D. Lakraj, MD, Ryan D. Walsh, MD, Medical College of Wisconsin, The Eye InstituteThis is a PowerPoint presentation, which teaches the symptom of palinopsia through a video of a patient's chief complaint in which he describes the symptom almost according to a textbook. This video is followed by a brief explanation of the etiology, management, and importance of diagnosing this sym...
129 Wallenberg Syndrome and Skew DeviationLauren Schneider, MD; Stamford Hospital, Stamford Ophthalmology, Stamford, CT ; Rudrani Banik, MD; New York Eye & Ear Infirmary of Mount Sinai, NY, NYPower point of case presentation of acute Wallenberg Syndrome associated with vertical diplopia, found by 3 step and supine testing to be consistent with skew deviation.
130 Lemierre Syndrome - A Neuroophthalmological ApproachVinzenz A. C. Vadasz, MD; Christina Gerth-Kahlert, MD; University Hospital of Zürich, Frauenklinikstrasse 24, 8091 Zürich, SwitzerlandCase report of a twenty-two year old woman with double vision after tonsillitis, caused through multiples thrombosis by an infection with fusobacterium necrophorum known as the Lemierre-Syndrome. Fig. 1: Ocular motility at ICU (lying position) Fig. 2: white arrows show thrombosis of the right opht...
131 Retinal Causes of a Neurologic-Type Visual Field DefectOmar Ozgur, MD; University of Texas, MD Anderson Cancer Center; Rudrani Banik, MD; New York Eye & Ear Infirmary of Mount Sinai, NY, NYPower point of case presentation of 47 year old female with history of breast cancer with new onset temporal visual field defect and photopsias. Differential diagnosis of homonymous hemianopia discussed; retinal causes of neurologic-type visual field defects reviewed including: white dot syndrome (m...
132 Neuromyelitis OpticaOmar Ozgur, MD; University of Texas, MD Anderson Cancer Center; Rudrani Banik, MD; New York Eye & Ear Infirmary of Mount Sinai, NY, NYPower point of case presentation of female with bilateral, sequential atypical optic neuritis. MRI Brain normal with no demyelination; MRI Spine shows enhancement at multiple levels and NMO antibody positive, confirming diagnosis of neuromyelitis optica (NMO). History of NMO discussed, diagnostic c...
133 The History of the International Neuro-Ophthalmology SocietyKlara Landau, MD, FEBO, Department of Ophthalmology, University Hospital Zurich, SwitzerlandThis presentation provides an ovreview of hte hisotry of the International Neuro-ophthalmology Society (INOS), with maps and photos.
134 Acute Retinal Necrosis (ARN)Gregory P. Van Stavern, MD, Associate Professor, Ophthalmology & Visual Sciences and Neurology, Washington University School of MedicineAcute Retinal Necrosis causes inflammation and subsequent retinal detachment. This powerpoint provides images depicting ARN.
135 Retinitis PigmentosaGregory P. Van Stavern, MD, Associate Professor, Ophthalmology & Visual Sciences and Neurology, Washington University School of MedicineRetinitis pigmentosa is a retinal/choroidal degeneration caused by various genetic defects. The term retinitis pigmentosa is really a misnomer since it is not inflammation (retinitis) and it is not a disease of the pigmentary system (pigmentosa).
136 Stargardt's DiseaseGregory P. Van Stavern, MD, Associate Professor, Ophthalmology & Visual Sciences and Neurology, Washington University School of MedicineStargardt's disease is an inherited maculopathy which frequently presents with a loss of central vision.
137 BirdshotGregory P. Van Stavern, MD, Associate Professor, Ophthalmology & Visual Sciences and Neurology, Washington University School of MedicineBirdshot Retinochoroidopathy is a posterior uveitis seen in women 30-60 years of age who present with floaters, changes in color vision, and difficulty with night vision.
138 HistoplasmosisGregory P. Van Stavern, MD, Associate Professor, Ophthalmology & Visual Sciences and Neurology, Washington University School of MedicineHistoplasmosis, a fungus, can present acutely as a systemic condition. This image shows signs of Histoplasmosis.
139 Acute Multifocal Pigment Epithelium Epitheliopathy (AMPEE)Gregory P. Van Stavern, MD, Associate Professor, Ophthalmology & Visual Sciences and Neurology, Washington University School of MedicineImages providing example of Acute Multifocal Pigment Epithelium Epitheliopathy (AMPEE)
140 Congenital and Secondary SyphilisGregory P. Van Stavern, MD, Associate Professor, Ophthalmology & Visual Sciences and Neurology, Washington University School of MedicineImages showing evideince of Congenital and Secondary Syphilis
141 Multifocal ChoroiditisGregory P. Van Stavern, MD, Associate Professor, Ophthalmology & Visual Sciences and Neurology, Washington University School of MedicineMulti-focal choroiditis is usually a bilateral choroidopathy seen more frequently in women associated with punched out appearing lesions occasionally with pigment around the edges. Image provides example.
142 Superonasal Transconjunctival Optic Nerve Sheath Decompression: A Modified Surgical Technique Without Extraocular Muscle DisinsertionKevin E. Lai, MD, Dean McGee Eye Institute, Department of Ophthalmology, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK, Neuro-Ophthalmology Institute, Indianapolis, IN; Kenneth C. Lao, MD, Dean McGee Eye Institute, Department of Ophthalmology, University of Oklahoma Health Science...Report on the surgical technique and outcomes of a modified medial transconjunctival approach to optic nerve sheath decompression (ONSD) in 15 patients. Supplemental Digital Content : Video that demonstrates the stONSD procedure. m4v: http://content.lib.utah.edu/cdm/ref/collection/EHSL-NOVEL/id/22...
143 What is White? Normal white structuresGregory P. Van Stavern, MD, Associate Professor, Ophthalmology & Visual Sciences and Neurology, Washington University School of MedicineThe only inherently "white" element in the normal eye is the sclera.
144 Serpiginous ChoroidopathyGregory P. Van Stavern, MD, Associate Professor, Ophthalmology & Visual Sciences and Neurology, Washington University School of MedicineSerpiginous choroidopathy (also known as Geographic choroidopathy) usually affects the choroid, the choriocapillaris and the retinal pigment epithelium in both eyes.
145 White Dot Syndromes: MEWDS, AZOOR, AIBSEGregory P. Van Stavern, MD, Associate Professor, Ophthalmology & Visual Sciences and Neurology, Washington University School of Medicine
146 Vogt Koyanagi-Harada (VKH) SyndromeGregory P. Van Stavern, MD, Associate Professor, Ophthalmology & Visual Sciences and Neurology, Washington University School of MedicineVogt-Koyanagi disease causes bilateral uveitis, along with alopecia, vitiligo, and hearing loss.
147 Pars PlanitisGregory P. Van Stavern, MD, Associate Professor, Ophthalmology & Visual Sciences and Neurology, Washington University School of MedicinePars planitis is an inflammatory condition seen in children and young adults. It is associated with inflammation of the pars plana--at the far periphery of the retina.
148 Tonic PupilAdesina, Ore-Ofe, MD; Clinical Assistant Professor, Department of Ophthalmology & Visual Science, University of Texas, Health Sciences Center at HoustonPowerPoint presentation covering tonic pupil, which is damage to ciliary ganglion or short posterior ciliary nerves. It causes denervation of the ciliary body and iris sphincter muscle.
149 Vision and Alzheimer's DiseaseVictoria S. Pelak, M.D. Associate Professor of Neurology University of Colorado Health Sciences Center
150 Usher syndromeGregory P. Van Stavern, MD, Associate Professor, Ophthalmology & Visual Sciences and Neurology, Washington University School of MedicinePowerpoint describing Usher Syndrome, a hereditary condition characterized by congenital, bilateral, and profound sensorineural hearing loss, adolescent onset Retinitis Pigmentosa (RP) and vestibular areflexia
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