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TitleDescriptionType
76 Temporal cupping with dominant hereditary optic atrophyLeft eye. Teenage boy. Dominant hereditary optic atrophy (Kjer). Shows temporal pallor only. Shallow temporal cup. Pair with IF2_2a. 1975.Image
77 Temporal cupping with dominant hereditary optic atrophyRight eye shows pallor and temporal cupping. Pair with IF2_3b. 1994Image
78 Temporal cupping with dominant hereditary optic atrophyLeft disc is hypoplastic and smaller with temporal pallor. Pair with IF2_3a. 1994Image
79 Temporal cupping with dominant hereditary optic atrophyRight eye with temporal pallor and shallow cupping. Pair with IF2_4b. 1960.Image
80 Temporal cupping with dominant hereditary optic atrophyLeft eye with temporal pallor and shallow cupping. Pair with IF2_4a. 1960.Image
81 Post giant cell arteritis ischemic papillopthyPost giant cell arteritis ischemic papillopathy. Note shallow cupping without vascular displacement.1994. Also note the irregular focal arteriolar narrowing. Blind eye. Male.Image
82 Central retinal artery occlusion with cilioretinal collateralsLeft eye, 1988, Central retinal artery with cilioretinal collaterals due to calcific embolic behind the lamina cribrosa due to calcific valvular heart disease. Collaterals have been called ""Nettleship Collaterals"", recognizing the British physician who first described them in 1892Image
83 Central retinal artery occlusion with cilioretinal collateralsRight eye, 1991, Central retinal artery occlusion with cilioretinal collateral occlusions due to calcific embolic occlusion behind the lamina cribrosa due to calcific valvular heart disease. Collaterals have been called "Nettleship Collaterals", recognizing the British physician who first described ...Image
84 Central retinal artery occlusion with cilioretinal collateralsRight eye, 1982, Central retinal artery occlusion with cilioretinal collateral occlusions due to calcific embolic occlusion behind the lamina cribrosa due to calcific valvular heart disease. Collaterals have been called "Nettleship Collaterals", recognizing the British physician who first described ...Image
85 Central retinal artery occlusion with choroidal arteriolar occlusionCentral retinal artery occlusion and choroidal vascular occlusion due to pressure on the eyeball during craniotomy. Note total loss of vascularity of the optic disc and surrounding choroid.Image
86 Central retinal artery occlusion with choroidal arteriole occlusion1980, Evidence of choroidal vascular ischemia. Central retinal artery occlusion and choroidal vascular occlusion from amputation of the optic nerve for meningiomaImage
87 Central retinal artery occlusion with choroidal arteriole occlusion1988, Central retinal artery occlusion and choroidal vascular occlusion, 70 year old woman with history of central retinal artery occlusion 30 years priorImage
88 Central retinal arteriolar occlusion with choroidal arteriole occlusion1969, Complete loss of blood supply to retina and choroid. Cause unknown. Boy.Image
89 Retinal pigmentary degeneration (sine pigmentosa)Retinal pigmentary degeneration (sine pigmentosa), with extreme arteriolar narrowing. 1967Image
90 Quinine toxicity (amblyopia)Quinine toxicity (amblyopia), 1971, blind eye, note diffuse arteriole narrowing and optic nerve pallor.
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91 Visible drusen with Retinitis PigmentosaRight eye. Optic disc drusen with retinitis pigmentosa. Note the marked narrowing of the retinal arterioles and the spectacular change in the peripapillary choroid.Image
92 Malignant optic nerve glioma, gross pathologic specimenPathologic specimen of optic nerve glioma shown in slide F2b_09. White material on top of swollen disc is myelin. Reference: Hoyt WF, Meshel LG, Lessell S, Schatz NJ, Suckling RD. Malignant optic glioma of adulthood. Brain. 1973;96(1):121-32.Image
93 Sturge Weber Syndrome (Encephalotrigeminal angiomatosis)Sturge Weber Syndrome (Encephalotrigeminal angiomatosis); Color of the retina is deep red (sometimes called tomato catsup) due to a four fold thickening of the choroidal vascular bed. Optic disc is cupped due to elevated intraocular pressure. (Secondary glaucoma) Patient had a major ""port wine"" m...Image
94 Sturge Weber Syndrome (Encephalotrigeminal angiomatosis)Left eye is normal, without the deep red from thickened Choroid. Pair with R1_B1aImage
95 Temporal cupping with dominant hereditary optic atrophy1969. Dominant hereditary optic atrophy (Kjer) Pair with IF2_1b. Right eye. Boy with reduced central acuity since childhood. Discs are pale temporally and the temporal nerve fiber layer is thin.Image
96 Temporal cupping with dominant hereditary optic atrophy1969. Dominant hereditary optic atrophy (Kjer) Pair with IF2_1a. Left eye. Boy with reduced central acuity since childhood. and the temporal nerve fiber layer is thin.Image
97 Temporal cupping with dominant hereditary optic atrophy1970. Right eye. Pair with IF2_5b. 55 year old woman with deficient vision all her life. Typical pattern of dominant hereditary atrophy. Temporal pallor and shallow cuppingImage
98 Temporal cupping with dominant hereditary optic atrophy1970. Left eye. Pair with IF2_5a. 55 year old woman with deficient vision all her life. Typical pattern of dominant hereditary atrophy. Temporal pallor and shallow cuppingImage
99 Papillitis with macular star. Cat Scratch Disease.Proven Bartonella neuroretinitis. Notice the deposit of exudates of Henle's layer making an almost complete macular star.Image
100 "Nettleship collaterals", a result of calcific embolization of the central retinal arteryResult of calcific embolization of the central retinal artery. The embolus itself can not be seen within the tissue of the optic disc. Numerous chorio-retino collaterals are filling the branches of a central retinal artery. Such an eye is always blind. These collaterals indicate that the patient pro...Image
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