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TitleCreatorDescription
26 Diffusion Weighted Imaging (DWI)John Pula, MD; NorthShore University; Glenview, ILDiffusion weighted imaging sequences are often included as part of a routine brain MRI protocol. Imaging provides examples of DWI.
27 Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI)John Pula, MD; NorthShore University; Glenview, ILDiffusion tensor (DT) MRI applies the direction of water diffusion through tissues to map out neural pathways in the brain, such as white matter tracts.
28 Vision and Alzheimer's DiseaseVictoria S. Pelak, M.D. Associate Professor of Neurology University of Colorado Health Sciences Center
29 Crowded Disc - FamilyWilliam F. Hoyt PhD, Professor Emeritus, University of California, San FranciscoLeft eye. PP3 a & b: sister; PP4 a&b: brother; Congenital disc margin blurring with crowded discs. Excellent example of pseudo papilledema
30 Evolution of optociliary veins with perioptic nerve sheathWilliam F. Hoyt PhD, Professor Emeritus, University of California, San FranciscoSeries of images showing progression of disc swelling and macular degeneration
31 Systemic Disorders With Optic Nerve and Retinal FindingsAAO/NANOS - American Academy of Ophthalmology / North American Neuro-Ophthalmology SocietyA 42-year old woman presented with a history of severe brow pain and 4 days of progressive visual loss OD. There was no increased pain on ocular rotation. Aside from heavy menses, she denied any significant past medical history. Her examination revealed acuity NLP OD, 20/25 OS; color vision 9/10 OS;...
32 White Dot Syndromes: MEWDS, AZOOR, AIBSEGregory P. Van Stavern, MD, Associate Professor, Ophthalmology & Visual Sciences and Neurology, Washington University School of Medicine
33 Best's Vittelform MaculopathyGregory P. Van Stavern, MD, Associate Professor, Ophthalmology & Visual Sciences and Neurology, Washington University School of MedicineThis 14 year old presented with decreased vision, headaches and central scotomas. She was found to have bilateral papilledema related to IIH and also Best's vitilliform maculopathy. The maculas are commonly described as having a "fried egg" sunny side up appearance.
34 Acute Retinal Necrosis (ARN)Gregory P. Van Stavern, MD, Associate Professor, Ophthalmology & Visual Sciences and Neurology, Washington University School of MedicineAcute Retinal Necrosis causes inflammation and subsequent retinal detachment. This powerpoint provides images depicting ARN.
35 Retinitis PigmentosaGregory P. Van Stavern, MD, Associate Professor, Ophthalmology & Visual Sciences and Neurology, Washington University School of MedicineRetinitis pigmentosa is a retinal/choroidal degeneration caused by various genetic defects. The term retinitis pigmentosa is really a misnomer since it is not inflammation (retinitis) and it is not a disease of the pigmentary system (pigmentosa).
36 Stargardt's DiseaseGregory P. Van Stavern, MD, Associate Professor, Ophthalmology & Visual Sciences and Neurology, Washington University School of MedicineStargardt's disease is an inherited maculopathy which frequently presents with a loss of central vision.
37 BirdshotGregory P. Van Stavern, MD, Associate Professor, Ophthalmology & Visual Sciences and Neurology, Washington University School of MedicineBirdshot Retinochoroidopathy is a posterior uveitis seen in women 30-60 years of age who present with floaters, changes in color vision, and difficulty with night vision.
38 HistoplasmosisGregory P. Van Stavern, MD, Associate Professor, Ophthalmology & Visual Sciences and Neurology, Washington University School of MedicineHistoplasmosis, a fungus, can present acutely as a systemic condition. This image shows signs of Histoplasmosis.
39 Acute Multifocal Pigment Epithelium Epitheliopathy (AMPEE)Gregory P. Van Stavern, MD, Associate Professor, Ophthalmology & Visual Sciences and Neurology, Washington University School of MedicineImages providing example of Acute Multifocal Pigment Epithelium Epitheliopathy (AMPEE)
40 Congenital and Secondary SyphilisGregory P. Van Stavern, MD, Associate Professor, Ophthalmology & Visual Sciences and Neurology, Washington University School of MedicineImages showing evideince of Congenital and Secondary Syphilis
41 Multifocal ChoroiditisGregory P. Van Stavern, MD, Associate Professor, Ophthalmology & Visual Sciences and Neurology, Washington University School of MedicineMulti-focal choroiditis is usually a bilateral choroidopathy seen more frequently in women associated with punched out appearing lesions occasionally with pigment around the edges. Image provides example.
42 What is White? Normal white structuresGregory P. Van Stavern, MD, Associate Professor, Ophthalmology & Visual Sciences and Neurology, Washington University School of MedicineThe only inherently "white" element in the normal eye is the sclera.
43 Serpiginous ChoroidopathyGregory P. Van Stavern, MD, Associate Professor, Ophthalmology & Visual Sciences and Neurology, Washington University School of MedicineSerpiginous choroidopathy (also known as Geographic choroidopathy) usually affects the choroid, the choriocapillaris and the retinal pigment epithelium in both eyes.
44 Vogt Koyanagi-Harada (VKH) SyndromeGregory P. Van Stavern, MD, Associate Professor, Ophthalmology & Visual Sciences and Neurology, Washington University School of MedicineVogt-Koyanagi disease causes bilateral uveitis, along with alopecia, vitiligo, and hearing loss.
45 Pars PlanitisGregory P. Van Stavern, MD, Associate Professor, Ophthalmology & Visual Sciences and Neurology, Washington University School of MedicinePars planitis is an inflammatory condition seen in children and young adults. It is associated with inflammation of the pars plana--at the far periphery of the retina.
46 Exposed Drusen (PowerPoint)William F. Hoyt PhD, Professor Emeritus, University of California, San FranciscoPP25a: Left eye: Severe visual field defect. PP25b: right eye with exposed drusen and field loss: visual field defects; PP25c: right eye visual field PP25d: left eye visual field.
47 Optic Atrophy (PowerPoint)William F. Hoyt PhD, Professor Emeritus, University of California, San Franciscoa) Evolution of optic disc pallor after optic nerve transection. Normal Right eye. Photo taken December 9, 1978. b) Injury on December 8, 1978. Evolution of optic disc pallor after optic nerve transection. Woman having rhinoplasty suffered optic nerve transection. One day after nerve transection. N...
48 Anterior Ischemic Optic Neuropathy (PowerPoint)AAO/NANOS - American Academy of Ophthalmology / North American Neuro-Ophthalmology SocietyThe patient is a 62-year-old female who presented in August 1996 with visual loss OD that she first noted as loss of her superior field in May 1996. She felt that it had been static since, and perhaps was even a little better in the week before she was seen. There was no pain, even with ocular rotat...
49 Orbital Tumors - Choroidal Folds From Orbital Mass (PowerPoint)AAO/NANOS - American Academy of Ophthalmology / North American Neuro-Ophthalmology SocietyThis 30-year-old man had a retrobulbar intraconal mass OS. The CT scans showed a heterogeneous lobulated enhancing mass, 2.2 x 1.9 x 1.8 cm. The case beautifully exhibits chorodial folds. The ultrasound showed internal reflectivity. The patient refused surgery.
50 Moyamoya Syndrome (PowerPoint)AAO/NANOS - American Academy of Ophthalmology / North American Neuro-Ophthalmology SocietyA 9-year-old boy had recurrent ischemic episodes that had begun 2 years prior to evaluation. A significant right hemiparesis and a significant speech, learning, and memory disorder were present. His noncontrast axial view CT scan demonstrated multiple cerebral infarcts. Cerebral angiography revealed...
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