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CreatorTitleDescriptionSubjectDate
26 McCullough, John M.Evidence for assortative mating and selection in surnames: a case from Yucatan, MexicoSurnames are often used as metaphors for genetic material on the assumption of neutrality and general immunity from systematic pressures. The Yucatec Maya use surnames of both Maya and Spanish origin. We find evidence of positive assortative mating by ethnic origin of surname and a slight bias away ...Surnames; Assortative mating; Maya1985
27 Rogers, Alan R.Evolution of time preference by natural selectionThis paper entertains the hypothesis that human time preferences are in evolutionary equilibrium (i.e. that no mutation changing time preferences could be favored by natural selection). This hypothesis implies that the marginal rate of substitution (MRS) holding Darwinian fitness constant must equal...Capitalism; Econometric models; Equilibrium1994-06
28 Codding, Brian F.Explaining prehistoric variation in the abundance of large prey: a zooarchaeological analysis of deer and rabbit hunting along the Pecho Coast of Central CaliforniaThree main hypotheses are commonly employed to explain diachronic variation in the relative abun dance of remains of large terrestrial herbivores: (1) large prey populations decline as a function of anthro pogenic overexploitation; (2 ) large prey tends to increase as a result of increasing social p...Foraging; Resource depression; Prestige hunting; Paleoclimatic variability; Human behavioral ecology; Zooarchaeology; Central California2009-11-14
29 Hawkes, KristenFamily provisioning is not the only reason men huntGurven and Hill (2009) ask, "Why do mean hunt?" As they say, "The observation that mean hunt and women gather supported the simplistic view of marriage as a cooperative enterprise. Greater sophistication suggests that males may often be motivated by mating and status rather than offspring investment...2010-01-01
30 Broughton, JohnFish remains dominate Barn Owl pellets in northwestern NevadaThe foraging ecology of the Barn Owl (Tytoalba) has been studied extensively, both in the New World (Marti 1988, Castro and Jaksic 1995, Van Vuren and Moore 1998, and others) and the Old World (Glue 1967, Yom-Tov and Wool 1997, and others). Small rodents, insectivores, and small birds are generally ...Barn Owl pellets; Northwestern Nevada; Fish; Fish remains2006
31 Hawkes, KristenFood sharing among Ache hunter-gatherers of Eastern ParaguayEmpirical research on food sharing among hunter-gatherers should provide critical data for evaluating both the possible role of food sharing in hominid evolution and the question of how such behavior could be selected.Hunter-gatherers; Ache; Paraguay; Anthropology1988-02
32 Rogers, Alan R.; Jorde, Lynn B.Founder effect: assessment of variation in genetic contributions among foundersWe present a Monte Carlo method for determining the distribution of founders' genetic contributions to descendant cohorts. The simulation of genes through known pedigrees generates the probability distributions of contributed genes in recent cohorts of descendants, their means, and their variances.1994
33 Rogers, Alan R.Genetic evidence for a Pleistocene population explosionExpansions of population size leave characteristic signatures in mitochondrial "mismatch distributions." Consequently, these distributions can inform us about the history of changes in population size. Here, I study a simple model of population history that assumes that, t generations before the pr...1995
34 Rogers, Alan R.; Jorde, Lynn B.Genetic evidence on modern human originsA review of genetic evidence leads to the following conclusions concerning human population history: (1) Between 33,000 and 150,000 years ago the human population expanded from an initial size of perhaps 10,000 breeding individuals, reaching a size of at least 300,000. (2) Although the initial popu...Population history; Mitochondrial DNA; Mismatch distribution; Intermatch distribution; Replacement hypothesis; Population bottlenecks1995
35 Rogers, Alan R.Genetic relatedness to sisters children has been underestimatedMales of many species help in the care and provisioning of offspring, and these investments often correlate with genetic relatedness. For example, many human males invest in the children of sisters, and this is especially so where men are less likely to share genes with children of wives. Although t...2013-01-01
36 Rogers, Alan R.; Harpending, Henry C.Genetic structure of ancient human populationsDiscusses mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequences as important source of data about the history of human species.Tree of descent; Mismatch distributions; Simulations; Findings; Intermatch distributions; Younger and older populations2001-09-15
37 Rogers, Alan R.; Jorde, Lynn B.Genetic structure of the Utah Mormons: comparison of results based on RFLPs, blood groups, migration matrices, isonymy, and pedigreesThe genetic structure of the Utah Mormon population is examined using 25 blood group and 47 RFLP alleles obtained from 442 subjects living in 8 geographic subdivisions. Nei's Gst was 0.013 (p < 0.002) for the RFLP data and 0.012 (p > 0.4) for the blood group data, showing that only 1% of the geneti...1994
38 Rogers, Alan R.Genetic variation at the MCIR Locus and the time since loss of human body hairThe melanocortin I receptor (MCIR) locus makes a protein that affects the color of skin and hair. At this locus, amino-acid differences are entirely absent among African humans, abundant among non-Africans (especially Europeans), and abundant in chimpanzee/human comparisons (Rana et al. 1999, Hardin...Nonsynonymous; Chimpanzee; Constraint2004
39 Hawkes, Kristen; O'Connell, James F.Global process and local ecology: how should we explain differences between the Hadza and the !Kung?In this chapter we discuss explanations for the diversity of behavior of contemporary forager populations. Other contributors document variation among southern African savanna Bushman groups, and central African forest Pygmies. We confine ourselves to trying to explain some differences between two ...1996
40 Hawkes, KristenGrandmothers and their consequencesBoth what we share and don't share with our primate cousins make us human. Easy enough to start a list. At least since Darwin, most would rate moral sentiments as distinctively human. But our modern selves didn't emerge from ancestral apes in one step. When did populations along the way become human...2012-01-01
41 Rogers, Alan R.Group selection by selective emigration: the effects of migration and kin structureGroup selection may operate through selective emigration, as Sewall Wright envisioned, as well as through selective extinction. The discrete-generation model of selective emigration developed here yields the following conclusions. 1. The fitness benefit of altruism, "depends on the frequency of altr...Natural selection; Selective extinction; Evolution1990-03
42 Hawkes, KristenHadza children's foraging: juvenile dependency, social arrangement and mobility among hunter-gatherersPresents a study on the foraging activities of Hadza children in Tanzania, Africa. Success of children's foraging; Determinants of children's foraging; Monitoring of the activities of children; Near-camp foraging return rates; Variables underlying the patterns of foraging.Children; Foraging; Hazda; Hunter-gatherers1995
43 Hawkes, KristenHadza scavenging: implications for Plio/Pleistocene Hominid subsistenceThe frequent association of stone tools and large animal bones in African Plio/Pleistocene archaeological sites has long been taken as evidence of the importance of hunting in early hominid diets. Many now argue that it reflects hominid scavenging, not hunting.Hadza; Scavenging; Plio/Pleistocene; Hominid Diet1988-04
44 Hawkes, KristenHadza women's time allocation, offspring provisioning, and the evolution of long postmenopausal life spansExtended provisioning of offspring and long postmenopausal life spans are characteristic of all modern humans but no other primates. These traits may have evolved in tandem. Analysis of relationships between women's time allocation and children's nutritional welfare among the Hadza of northern Tanza...Child care; Children, nutrition; Life spans, Biology; Mother & child; Primates; Social structure; Women; Time Management; Hominids1997
45 Broughton, JohnHomestead cave IchthyofaunaBiological evidence on the climatic and hydrographic history of the intermountain region would be much richer, if we had more than the present dribble of paleontological data on the fishes (Hubbs and Miller, 1948, p. 25). In this passage from their landmark synthesis of historical fish biogeograph...Homestead Cave; Ichthyofauna; Lake Bonneville2000
46 Rogers, Alan R.How much can fossils tell us about regional continuity?Presents a study on the genetic contribution of earlier populations to later populations within regions called regional continuity. Testing for regional continuity with multiple characters; Replacement of archaic population by a population of modern humans.Human genetics; Fossils; Regional continuity2006-06-05
47 Cashdan, Elizabeth A.How women competeMen are more physically aggressive and more risk-prone than women, but are not necessarily more competitive. New data show the gender difference in competitiveness to be one of kind rather than degree, with women and men competing in different ways and, to some extent, over different objectives, but...Gender differences, behavior; Competition; Aggression1999-06
48 O'Rourke, Dennis H.Hrdlič̌ka's Aleutian population-replacement hypothesis: a radiometric evaluationIn a 1945 monograph, Hrdlička argued that, at 1,000 BP, Paleo-Aleut people on Umnak Island were replaced by Neo-Aleut groups moving west along the island chain. His argument was based on cranial measurements of skeletal remains from Chaluka Midden and mummified remains from Kagamil and Ship Rock b...Population replacement; Paleo-Aleuts; Neo-Aleuts2006
49 Hawkes, KristenHuman life histories: primate trade-offs, grandmothering socioecology, and the fossil recordHuman life histories differ from those of other animals in several striking ways. Recently Smith and Tompkins (1995, p. 258) highlighted the combination of "slow" and "fast" features of human lives. Our period of juvenile dependency is unusually long, our age at first reproduction is late, and we h...Meat; Maturity; Life Span2003
50 Hawkes, KristenHunting and nuclear families: some lessons from the Hadza about men's workHadza hunter-gatherers display economic and social features usually assumed to indicate the dependence of wives and children on provisioning husbands and fathers. The wives and children of better Hadza hunters have been found to be better-nourished, consistent with the assumption that men hunt to pr...Subsistence economy; Tindiga, African people; Subsistence hunting2001-10-24
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