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CreatorTitleDescriptionSubjectDate
1 O'Rourke, Dennis H.Refutation of the general single locus model for the etiology of schizophreniaAll published studies on the familial incidence of schizophrenia appropriate for testing the applicability of the general single-locus two-allele model are examined under the assumption of a unitary etiology for all schizophrenia. We show that the single major locus model is inadequate to predict th...Genetics; Diseases in Twins; Chromosome Mapping1982
2 Rogers, Alan R.Doubts about isonymyThe method of isonymy, developed by Crow and Mange for estimating inbreeding from surname frequencies, requires an assumption that has not been appreciated: It is necessary to assume that all males in some ancestral generation, the founding stock, had unique surnames. Because this assumption is sel...1991
3 Rogers, Alan R.Migration and genetic drift in human populationsIn humans and many other species, mortality is concentrated early in the life cycle, and is low during the ages of dispersal and reproduction. Yet precisely the opposite is assumed by classical population-genetics models of migration and genetic drift. We introduce a model in which population regul...Frequencies; Variance; Dynamics1986
4 Rogers, Alan R.; Jorde, Lynn B.Ascertainment bias in estimates of average heterozygosityPopulation geneticists work with a nonrandom sample of the human genome. Conventional practice ensures that unusually variable loci are most likely to be discovered and thus included in the sample of loci. Consequently, estimates of average heterozygosity are biased upward. In what follows we descri...Bias (Epidemiology); Biometry; Heterozygote1996-05
5 Cashdan, Elizabeth A.Sex differences in aggression: what does evolutionary theory predict?The target article claims that evolutionary theory predicts the emergence of sex differences in aggression in early childhood, and that there will be no sex difference in anger. It also finds an absence of sex differences in spousal abuse in Western societies. All three are puzzling from an evolutio...2009-08
6 Hawkes, KristenHadza scavenging: implications for Plio/Pleistocene Hominid subsistenceThe frequent association of stone tools and large animal bones in African Plio/Pleistocene archaeological sites has long been taken as evidence of the importance of hunting in early hominid diets. Many now argue that it reflects hominid scavenging, not hunting.Hadza; Scavenging; Plio/Pleistocene; Hominid Diet1988-04
7 Codding, Brian F.A land of work: foraging behavior and ecologyWork is a core theme in many of the major issues and debates in California archaeology. Work is central in understanding why the first Californians entered the region (e.g., Erlandson, this volume): how thousands of years of work following colonization resulted in the overexploitation of particular ...Human behavioral ecology; Hunter-gatherer; North America: California2012-03-15
8 Codding, Brian F.Explaining prehistoric variation in the abundance of large prey: a zooarchaeological analysis of deer and rabbit hunting along the Pecho Coast of Central CaliforniaThree main hypotheses are commonly employed to explain diachronic variation in the relative abun dance of remains of large terrestrial herbivores: (1) large prey populations decline as a function of anthro pogenic overexploitation; (2 ) large prey tends to increase as a result of increasing social p...Foraging; Resource depression; Prestige hunting; Paleoclimatic variability; Human behavioral ecology; Zooarchaeology; Central California2009-11-14
9 Codding, Brian F.Interpreting abundance indices: some zooarchaeological implications of Martu foragingIndices of taxonomic abundance are commonly used by zooarchaeologists to examine resource inten sification, overexploitation and gender divisions in foraging labor. The original formulation of abundance indices developed a clear interpretive framework by linking the measure with foraging models from...Human behavioral ecology; Zooarchaeology; Ethnoarchaeology; Resource intensification; Gender division of labor; Western Australia2010-07-20
10 Rogers, Alan R.The molecular clockThe molecular clock uses evolutionary changes in proteins and DNA to measure the passage of time. Yet molecular evolution is clocklike only to a first approximation. Uncertainties arise because of variation in rates of molecular evolution, because of difficulty in calibrating clocks, and because we ...2013-01-01
11 Hawkes, KristenOn life history evolution (a comment on Chisholm)Chisholm (CA 34:I-24) is right that the theory, models, and data of evolutionary biology apply to questions asked by social scientists. Work in life-history theory (Stearns 1992, Roff 1992, Charnov 1993) has especially provocative implications for the understanding of human development (see review i...1994-01-01
12 Hawkes, KristenOn optimal foraging models and subsistence transitionsLayton, Foley, and Williams are right: "progress" doesn't explain transitions from hunting and gathering to agriculture, by theory and models from behavioral ecology might.1992-01-01
13 Hawkes, KristenOn why male foragers hunt and share food: Reply to Hill and KaplanMy argument is this: Some food resources, notably large animals when they are unpredictably acquired, are too expensive to defend. Other can claim shares of them without repaying shares of the same foods later.1993-01-01
14 Hawkes, KristenHadza children's foraging: juvenile dependency, social arrangement and mobility among hunter-gatherersPresents a study on the foraging activities of Hadza children in Tanzania, Africa. Success of children's foraging; Determinants of children's foraging; Monitoring of the activities of children; Near-camp foraging return rates; Variables underlying the patterns of foraging.Children; Foraging; Hazda; Hunter-gatherers1995
15 Loeb, Laurence D.Prestige and piety in the Iranian synagogueAmong Iranian Jews, long deprived of meaningful political power and afraid to conspicuously display material wealth, relative prestige became more valued that authority of opulence. The synagogue provides the traditional public forum where meaningful interaction among its members reinforces rand dif...Shirazi Jewish Socieity1978
16 McElreath, RichardCan females gain additional paternal investment by mating with multiple males? a game theoretic approachAlthough females may require only one mating to become inseminated, many female animals engage in costly mating with multiple males. One potential benefit of polyandrous mating is gaining parental investment from multiple males. We developed two game theoretic models to explore this possibility. Our...Female multiple mating; Polyandry; Nonprocreative mating; Paternal investment; Mating benefits; Mating strategy2001-11
17 Cashdan, Elizabeth A.Competition between foragers and food producers on the Botletli River, BotswanaThe immigration of food-producing groups into areas occupied by hunters and gatherers must have been a common occurrence in prehistory. How were the hunter-gatherers affected by this? I describe here two groups of Kalahari Basarwa ('Bushmen'), one living along the flood plain of the lower Botletli ...Kalahari Basarwa; Bushmen; Foraging; Cattle1986
18 Rogers, Alan R.Genetic relatedness to sisters children has been underestimatedMales of many species help in the care and provisioning of offspring, and these investments often correlate with genetic relatedness. For example, many human males invest in the children of sisters, and this is especially so where men are less likely to share genes with children of wives. Although t...2013-01-01
19 Cashdan, Elizabeth A.Territoriality among human foragers: ecological models and an application to four Bushman GroupsDiscussions of human territoriality have become more sophisticated in recent years; we see fewer arguments for or against the adaptiveness of territoriality for mankind in general and more attempts to probe the ecological factors that make territoriality adaptive in particular circumstances.Foraging; Ecological Models; Bushman1983-02
20 Rogers, Alan R.; Jorde, Lynn B.Modeling the amplification dynamics of human Alu retrotransposonsRetrotransposons have had a considerable impact on the overall architecture of the human genome. Currently, there are three lineages of retrotransposons (Alu, L1, and SVA) that are believed to be actively replicating in humans. While estimates of their copy number, sequence diversity, and levels of ...Retrotransposons; Amplification dynamics; Mutation; Human-chimpanzee divergence2005
21 Cashdan, Elizabeth A.Waist-to-hip ratio across cultures: trade-offs between androgen- and estrogen-dependent traitsA gynoid pattern of fat distribution, with small waist and large hips (low waist-to-hip ratio, or WHR) holds significant fitness benefits for women: women with a low WHR of about 0.7 are more fecund, are less prone to chronic disease, and (in most cultures) are considered more attractive. Why, then...Fat distribution; Gynoid pattern; Body types; Waist-to-hip ratio; WHR2008
22 Hawkes, Kristen; O'Connell, James F.Global process and local ecology: how should we explain differences between the Hadza and the !Kung?In this chapter we discuss explanations for the diversity of behavior of contemporary forager populations. Other contributors document variation among southern African savanna Bushman groups, and central African forest Pygmies. We confine ourselves to trying to explain some differences between two ...1996
23 Rogers, Alan R.; Jorde, Lynn B.Genetic evidence on modern human originsA review of genetic evidence leads to the following conclusions concerning human population history: (1) Between 33,000 and 150,000 years ago the human population expanded from an initial size of perhaps 10,000 breeding individuals, reaching a size of at least 300,000. (2) Although the initial popu...Population history; Mitochondrial DNA; Mismatch distribution; Intermatch distribution; Replacement hypothesis; Population bottlenecks1995
24 Broughton, JohnSize of the bursa of fabricius in relation to gonad size and age in laysan and black-footed albatrossesAge determination can be difficult for birds that undergo little or no plumage change during life. This is the case for Laysan and Black-footed Albatrosses (Diomedea immutabilis and D. nigripes). The juvenile plumage for both these North Pacific albatrosses is completely grown by about five to six m...Birds; Species; Development1994
25 Codding, Brian F.Environmental productivity predicts migration, demographic, and linguistic patterns in prehistoric CaliforniaGlobal patterns of ethnolinguistic diversity vary tremendously. Some regions show very little variation even across vast expanses, whereas others exhibit dense mosaics of different languages spoken alongside one another. Compared with the rest of Native North America, prehistoric California exemplif...Colonization of North America; Prehistoric migrations; Human behavioral ecology; Ideal free distribution; Ideal despotic distribution2013-09-03
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