Prenatal isolated mild ventriculomegaly is associated with persistent ventricle enlargement at ages 1 and 2

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3386468/
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Links to Media http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3386468/
Publication Type journal article
Creator Gerig, Guido
Other Author Lyall, Amanda E.; Woolson, Sandra; Wolf, Honor M.; Goldman, Barbara Davis; Reznick, J. Steven; Hamer, Robert M.; Lin, Weili; Styner, Martin; Gilmore, John H.
Title Prenatal isolated mild ventriculomegaly is associated with persistent ventricle enlargement at ages 1 and 2
Date 2012-01-01
Description Background-Enlargement of the lateral ventricles is thought to originate from abnormal prenatal brain development and is associated with neurodevelopmental disorders. Fetal isolated mild ventriculomegaly (MVM) is associated with enlargement of lateral ventricle volumes in the neonatal period and developmental delays in early childhood. However, little is known about postnatal brain development in these children. Methods-Twenty-eight children with fetal isolated MVM and 56 matched controls were followed at ages 1 and 2 years with structural imaging on a 3T Siemens scanner and assessment of cognitive development with the Mullen Scales of Early Learning. Lateral ventricle, total gray and white matter volumes, and Mullen cognitive composite scores and subscale scores were compared between groups. Results-Compared to controls, children with prenatal isolated MVM had significantly larger lateral ventricle volumes at ages 1 and 2 years. Lateral ventricle volume at 1 and 2 years of age was significantly correlated with prenatal ventricle size. Enlargement of the lateral ventricles was associated with increased intracranial volumes and increased gray and white matter volumes. Children with MVM had Mullen composite scores similar to controls, although there was evidence of delay in fine motor and expressive language skills. Conclusions-Children with prenatal MVM have persistent enlargement of the lateral ventricles through the age of 2 years; this enlargement is associated with increased gray and white matter volumes and some evidence of delay in fine motor and expressive language development. Further study is needed to determine if enlarged lateral ventricles are associated with increased risk for neurodevelopmental disorders.
Type InteractiveResource
Publisher Elsevier
Journal Title Early Human Development
Volume 88
Issue 8
First Page 691
Last Page 698
DOI doi:10.1016/j.earlhumdev.2012.02.003
Subject Magnetic resonance imaging; Ultrasound; Gray matter; White matter; Cognitive development
Language eng
Bibliographic Citation Lyall, A. E.; Woolson, S.; Wolf, H. M.; Goldman, B. D., Reznick, J. S., Hamer, R. M., Lin, W., Styner, M., Gerig, G., & Gilmore, J. H. (2012). Prenatal isolated mild ventriculomegaly is associated with persistent ventricle enlargement at ages 1 and 2. Early Human Development, 88(8), 691-8.
Rights Management (c) Elsevier ; Authors manuscript from Lyall, A. E.; Woolson, S.; Wolf, H. M.; Goldman, B. D., Reznick, J. S., Hamer, R. M., Lin, W., Styner, M., Gerig, G., & Gilmore, J. H. (2012). Prenatal isolated mild ventriculomegaly is associated with persistent ventricle enlargement at ages 1 and 2, 88(8), 691-8. Early Human Development. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.earlhumdev.2012.02.003. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3386468/
Format Medium application/html
Identifier uspace, 19173
ARK ark:/87278/s6hm8jj6
Setname ir_uspace
Date Created 2015-03-09
Date Modified 2015-03-09
ID 712862
Reference URL https://collections.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s6hm8jj6
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