How students socially evaluate interest: peer responsiveness influences evaluation and maintenance of interest

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Publication Type Manuscript
School or College College of Social & Behavioral Science
Department Psychology
Creator Sansone, Carol
Other Author Thoman, Dustin B.; Fraughton, Tamra; Pasupathi, Monisha
Title How students socially evaluate interest: peer responsiveness influences evaluation and maintenance of interest
Date 2012-01-01
Description Social influences (e.g., by teachers, parents and peers) on students' experience of interest are typically described in terms of affecting students' initial choice of and/or completion of specific educational activities. When considered within the framework of the Self-Regulation of Motivation (SRM) model, however, other people may influence the interest experience even after activity completion, by influencing how a person evaluates that past experience. Previous experimental research showed that when students talked about a game upon completion, listeners' responsiveness influenced their evaluation of interest. The present research examined whether peer responsiveness when undergraduates talked about topics covered in actual classes predicted students' evaluation of class interest. In Study 1, we examined responsiveness in the context of conversations that took place as a structured part of an online psychology class (i.e., discussion board), and found that the frequency of replies from classmates to students' posts (but not the reverse) predicted students' interest in the class measured at the end of the semester. In Study 2, we examined responsiveness in the context of students' reported everyday conversations about two completed interesting class topics or two completed class exams in an introductory physics course. Perceived listener responsiveness in conversations about class topics (but not about exams) predicted students' concurrent evaluation of class interest, even when controlling for anticipated interest at the beginning of the semester. Moreover, listeners indirectly affected interest measured at the end of the semester via their influence on interest during the semester.
Type Text
Publisher Elsevier
Volume 37
Issue 4
First Page 254
Last Page 265
Dissertation Institution University of Utah
Language eng
Bibliographic Citation Thoman, D. B., Sansone, C., Fraughton, T., & Pasupathi, M. (2012). How students socially evaluate interest: peer responsiveness influences evaluation and maintenance of interest. Contemporary Educational Psychology, 37(4), 254-65.
Rights Management (c) Elsevier ; Reprinted from Thoman, D. B., Sansone, C., Fraughton, T., & Pasupathi, M. (2012). How students socially evaluate interest: peer responsiveness influences evaluation and maintenance of interest. Contemporary Educational Psychology, 37(4), 254-65. http://dx.doi.org/DOI: 10.1016/j.cedpsych.2012.04.001.
Format Medium application/pdf
Format Extent 4,748,488 bytes
Identifier uspace,17896
ARK ark:/87278/s69s28t2
Setname ir_uspace
Date Created 2012-12-21
Date Modified 2021-05-06
ID 708287
Reference URL https://collections.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s69s28t2
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