Kathryn S. Olmsted. Real enemies: conspiracy theories and American Democracy, World War I to 9/11

Update item information
Publication Type Journal Article
School or College College of Humanities
Department History
Creator Goldberg, Robert A.
Title Kathryn S. Olmsted. Real enemies: conspiracy theories and American Democracy, World War I to 9/11
Date 2010-04
Description In 1963, historian Richard Hofstadter donned the clinician's white coat to describe conspiracy theorists and a "paranoid style of American politics" given to exaggeration, distortion, and fantastical thinking. If still the favorite of journalists, Hofstadter's ideas have been significantly revised in the last decade by scholars from diverse disciplines. Their studies have placed conspiracy theorists in a broader frame by considering the institutional, cultural, and technological means that have made conspiracy thinking a mainstream phenomenon. These scholars have suggested that elites in government and the media join countersubversives to teach citizens to fear conspiracy.
Type Text
Publisher University of Chicago Press - Journals
Journal Title The American Historical Review
Volume 115
Issue 2
First Page 576
Last Page 577
DOI 10.1086/ahr.115.2.576
citatation_issn 0002-8762
Language eng
Bibliographic Citation Goldberg, R. A. (2010). Kathryn S. Olmsted. Real enemies: conspiracy theories and American Democracy, World War I to 9/11. American Historical Review, 115(2), 576-7.
Rights Management (c) University of Chicago Press http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/http:// www.DOI: 10.1086/ahr.115.2.576.
Format Medium application/pdf
Format Extent 114,196 bytes
Identifier ir-main,13416
ARK ark:/87278/s6k652rf
Setname ir_uspace
Date Created 2012-06-13
Date Modified 2021-05-06
ID 707559
Reference URL https://collections.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s6k652rf
Back to Search Results