Artificial and transplanted organs: movable parts and the unmoving law

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Publication Type Journal Article
School or College College of Law
Department Law
Creator Francis, Leslie
Title Artificial and transplanted organs: movable parts and the unmoving law
Date 1984
Description In the seventeenth century, John Locke asked whether we would end up with the same person if we replaced bodily parts one by one. He concluded t h a t the person would remain the same, despite continued replacement of material parts, because the identity of a human being consists of continued participation in the same organized life.1 Locke's speculation is not nearly so hypothetical today as it once must have seemed. We now have available, in more or less developed states, artificial skin, blood vessels, kidneys, ears, joints, hands, feet, hearts and heart valves. We can grasp, pump blood, hear, and filter wastes, all with artificial devices. We can transplant corneas, bone marrow, livers, kidneys, hearts and lungs. With the recent implantation of the artificial heart, there is a growing dispute about whether natural organ transplantation or artificial organ implantation present the best long-range therapeutic prospects.2
Type Text
Publisher University of Utah
Volume 11
Issue 1
First Page 29
Last Page 59
Subject Organ replacement; Artificial organs; Liability
Language eng
Bibliographic Citation Francis, L. (1984). Artificial and transplanted organs: movable parts and the unmoving law. Journal of Contemporary Law, 11(1), 29-59.
Rights Management (c)University of Utah
Format Medium application/pdf
Format Extent 23,305,943 bytes
Identifier ir-main,2532
ARK ark:/87278/s62r496n
Setname ir_uspace
Date Created 2012-06-13
Date Modified 2012-06-13
ID 706495
Reference URL https://collections.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s62r496n
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