Descartes on unknown faculties and our knowledge of the external world

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Publication Type Journal Article
School or College College of Humanities
Department Philosophy
Creator Newman, Lex
Title Descartes on unknown faculties and our knowledge of the external world
Date 1994
Description Descartes introduces his skeptical arguments, in the First Meditation, in an order of increasing strength. First, the narrator-meditator notices that judgments concerning the nature of small and distant objects are unreliable; later, that even sensory judgments about large and close objects are in doubt-this after considering an argument related to madness and another related to dreaming; finally, that no judgments resist doubt-the renowned Deceiver Hypothesis is introduced, a skeptical device intended to undermine not only the judgment that an external, corporeal world exists, but even the most certain judgments in mathematics.1 For each of these skeptical problems (with the exception of the madness worry), Descartes provides an argument in the later (epis-temologically constructive) Meditations that is its complement. In this paper, I focus on the complementary pair that concerns the problem of the existence of the external, corporeal world.
Type Text
Publisher Duke University Press
First Page 489
Last Page 431
Subject Corporeal existence; Skeptical argument
Subject LCSH Descartes, Rene; Reality; Dreams
Language eng
Bibliographic Citation Newman, L. (1994). Descartes on unknown faculties and our knowledge of the external world. Philosophical Review, 103,(3), 489-31.
Rights Management (c) Duke University Press
Format Medium application/pdf
Format Extent 3,862,394 Bytes
Identifier ir-main,2498
ARK ark:/87278/s61v5zj3
Setname ir_uspace
Date Created 2012-06-13
Date Modified 2021-05-06
ID 706473
Reference URL https://collections.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s61v5zj3
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