Ghettos and jobs in history: neighborhood effects on African American occupational status and mobility in World War I-era Cincinnati, Ohio

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Publication Type Journal Article
School or College College of Social & Behavioral Science
Department Economics
Creator Maloney, Thomas N.
Title Ghettos and jobs in history: neighborhood effects on African American occupational status and mobility in World War I-era Cincinnati, Ohio
Date 2005
Description This article examines how residence in racially segregated neighborhoods affected the job prospects of African American men in the late 1910s. The analysis focuses on one northern city-Cincinnati, Ohio.The evidence comes from a new longitudinal dataset containing information on individuals linked from the 1920 census to World War I selective service registration records. The results indicate that black male residents of Cincinnati's west end ghetto held occupations similar to those of black men in other Cincinnati neighborhoods and experienced similar rates of upward occupational mobility. Surprisingly, black men in the west end experienced lower rates of downward occupational mobility than did black men in other parts of the city.
Type Text
Publisher Duke University Press
Volume 29
Issue 2
First Page 241
Last Page 268
Subject Economic outcomes; Residential segregation; Black urban neighborhoods
Subject LCSH Discrimination in housing; Discrimination in employment
Language eng
Bibliographic Citation Maloney, T. N. (2005). Ghettos and jobs in history: neighborhood effects on African American occupational status and mobility in World War I-Era Cincinnati, Ohio. Social Science History, 29(2), 241-68.
Rights Management (c) Duke University Press
Format Medium application/pdf
Format Extent 230,488 bytes
Identifier ir-main,1841
ARK ark:/87278/s6vt29kn
Setname ir_uspace
Date Created 2012-06-13
Date Modified 2012-06-13
ID 705983
Reference URL https://collections.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s6vt29kn
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