Making the effort: the racial contours of Detroit's labor markets, 1920-1940

Update item information
Publication Type Journal Article
School or College College of Social & Behavioral Science
Department Economics
Program <blank>
Creator Maloney, Thomas N.
Other Author Whatley, Warren C.
Title Making the effort: the racial contours of Detroit's labor markets, 1920-1940
Date 1995
Description In 1940 the Ford Motor Company employed half of the black men in Detroit but only 14 percent of the whites. The authors postulate that black Detroiters were concentrated at Ford because they were excluded from working elsewhere. Those most affected were young married black men. A Ford job was virtually the only opportunity they had to earn a family wage; but to keep it, they had to put out extra effort that Ford required. White married men in Detroit had better employment opportunites elsewhere, so they tended to avoid Ford or leave quickly.
Type Text
Publisher Cambridge University Press
Volume 55
Issue 3
First Page 465
Last Page 493
Subject Automotive workers - Blacks; Ford Motor Company
Subject LCSH Labor economics; Automobile industry and trade; Blacks - Employment
Dissertation Institution University of Utah
Language eng
Bibliographic Citation Maloney, T. N. & Whatley, W. C. (1995). Making the effort: the racial contours of Detroit's Labor Markets, 1920-1940. Journal of Economic History, 55(3), 465-93.
Rights Management (c) Cambridge University Press
Format Medium application/pdf
Format Extent 3,382,292 bytes
Identifier ir-main,1165
ARK ark:/87278/s6k07nmc
Setname ir_uspace
Date Created 2012-06-13
Date Modified 2013-02-07
ID 704704
Reference URL https://collections.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s6k07nmc
Back to Search Results