Individual differences in script reports: implications for language assessment

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Publication Type Journal Article
School or College College of Social & Behavioral Science
Department Psychology
Creator Berg, Cynthia A.
Other Author Ross, Barbara L.
Title Individual differences in script reports: implications for language assessment
Date 1990
Description When individuals are asked to describe routine events, their descriptions often exhibit characteristics of script reports (Schank & Abelson, 1977). A script has been defined as a set of expectations individuals have about routine events that is organized in a temporal-causal sequence of acts or single actions (Fivush, 1984; Nelson, Fivush, Hudson, & Lucariello, 1983). Individuals use the organization of scripts to describe routine events and to aid in their memory of specific instances of events (Bower, Black & Turner, 1979). The organization of scripts has also been found to enhance children's use and comprehension of language (Constable, 1986; Furman & Walden, 1989; Lucariello, Kyratzis, & Engel, 1986).
Type Text
Publisher Lippincott, Williams & Wilkins
Journal Title Topics in Language Disorders
Volume 10
First Page 30
Last Page 44
Subject Script reports; Language assessment
Subject LCSH Schemas (Psychology)
Language eng
Bibliographic Citation Ross, B. L., & Berg, C. A. (1990). Individual differences in script reports: implications for language assessment. Topics in Language Disorders, 10, 30-44.
Rights Management (c) Lippincott Williams and Wilkins ; Reprinted from Ross, B. L., & Berg, C. A. (1990). Individual differences in script reports: implications for language assessment. Topics in Language Disorders, 10, 30-44.
Format Medium application/pdf
Format Extent 1,036,411 bytes
Identifier ir-main,14265
ARK ark:/87278/s6cn7n74
Setname ir_uspace
Date Created 2012-06-13
Date Modified 2012-06-13
ID 704659
Reference URL https://collections.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s6cn7n74
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