Personnel policy, costs of experimentation, and racial inequality in the Pre-World War II North

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Publication Type Journal Article
School or College College of Social & Behavioral Science
Department Economics
Creator Maloney, Thomas N.
Title Personnel policy, costs of experimentation, and racial inequality in the Pre-World War II North
Date 1999
Description Between 1910 and 1940, the black population of the northern United States nearly tripled, rising from just over I million to more than 2.7 million, signaling the start of the "Great Migration" of African-Americans out of the South. As black workers entered the North, they sought positions in new sectors of the economy. The share of northern black workers in manufacturing rose from about 17 percent to 28 percent during these years, while the shares in agriculture and personal services fell sharply. Consequently, many northern employers faced new questions regarding race in the labor market. Some had to consider whether to hire black workers for the first time. The attitudes of individual employers were certainly important, but were there more systematic determinants of an employers' willingness to experiment with the growing northern black labor pool?
Type Text
Publisher MIT Press
Volume 30
Issue 2
First Page 235
Last Page 258
Subject Race bias; Personnel policies; African Americans; Employment opportunities
Subject LCSH Blacks; Employment (Economic theory); Racial discrimination
Language eng
Bibliographic Citation Maloney, T. N. (1999). Personnel policy, costs of experimentation, and racial inequality in the Pre-World War II North. Journal of Interdisciplinary History, 30(2). 235-58
Rights Management (c) MIT Press
Format Medium application/pdf (portable document)
Format Extent 1,242,765 Bytes
Identifier ir-main,1162
ARK ark:/87278/s66q2fcp
ID 702794
setname ir_uspace
Reference URL https://collections.lib.utah.edu/details?id=702794
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